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March 6-8, 2019
University of San Diego

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Wednesday, March 6
 

2:15pm

A Networked Campus Approach to Increase Student Voting
Only one in five eligible Stanford students (undergraduate, graduate, and postdocs) voted in the 2014 mid-term election. In partnership with TurboVote, in spring 2018 a campus effort was launched to inspire eligible students to register and get absentee ballots, to build a community message around the importance of voting, and to overcome obstacles to encourage our community to cast votes in the November elections. Together we created strategies engaging leadership, grassroots action, courses, and more. Come learn what made the difference and share your own ideas and lessons on increasing voting. We will share activities inspired by staff, faculty, and students toward a shared understanding of the importance of voting to the future of our democracy. Because "Democracy is NOT a Spectator Sport!"

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Kyle Williams

Brandon Kyle Williams

Cardinal Service Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, Stanford University
As the Cardinal Service Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, Brandon conducts campus-wide outreach and awareness activities, ensures a welcoming environment for students, and advises students on how to make service a distinctive feature of their Stanford experience. Brandon graduated... Read More →
avatar for Megan Swezey Fogarty

Megan Swezey Fogarty

Deputy Executive Director, Haas Center for Public Service, Stanford University
Megan's career has centered on institutional efforts to expand higher education and K-12 service engagement, including supporting the launch of AmeriCorps in California. She leads communication, outreach, and fundraising strategy for Stanford University's civic action plan called... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ G

2:15pm

Boundary Spanning Leadership: Infusing a Civic Mission in Institutions
Boundary spanning leadership is the “ability to create direction, alignment and commitment across organizational boundaries in service of a higher vision or goal (Ernst & Chrobot-Mason).” At the nexus of institutional change for civic action lies the opportunity to utilize boundary leadership to effect change. This session's goals are to identify common boundaries which exist in higher education today and then explore and test out boundary spanning practices in leveraging your leadership such as buffering, reflecting, connecting, mobilizing, weaving and transforming.

Speakers
avatar for Char Gray-Sorensen

Char Gray-Sorensen

Director, Strategic Initiatives and Operations, CC of NY & PA
My 35 yr. career spans the faith-based, nonprofit, and higher education sectors as I've focused on building healthy organizations and relationships to enable people to thrive as they grow and learn. I'm interested in building capacity through leadership development, strategic partnerships... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ E

3:45pm

Coming Together as a Community to Nurture Students in STEAM
Preparing historically disadvantaged minority students for professions in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, enriched through the Arts (STEAM), is a community effort. Unfortunately, too many students do not believe that they are capable in STEM, or lack important resources and information about requirements and pathways leading to STEAM degrees and careers. As an Anchor Institution, USD is poised to address these issues. This presentation highlights two tandem efforts designed to invite, support, and engage the community to support this student population: 1) The STEAM Summer Academy provides quality educational programming for middle and high school students throughout San Diego’s diverse urban communities, with a focus on students from low-income areas. During the week-long experience, students are challenged to consider how developing their STEAM skills can help them address society’s most pressing issues, including poverty and unequal access to education. 2) The STEAM Youth and Community Conference is a free, one-day event that engages students and their families, the university community, STEAM professionals from minority communities, local educators, and community leaders. This workshop begins with an overview of the two programs, followed by several hands-on STEAM activities. The session ends with a conversation where participants share their questions and feedback.

Speakers
OD

Odesma Dalrymple

Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego
avatar for Perla Myers

Perla Myers

Professor, University of San Diego
JS

Joi Spencer

Associate Professor, University of San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ E

3:45pm

Critically Exploring Assessment: Tensions in Developing Inclusive Assessment Practices
Assessment is seen as critical in higher ed and in community engagement/service-learning, but little research explores how to incorporate a social justice framework into assessment practices. Given the diversity of our students and their experiences, how can we honor the many ways they learn and convey knowledge? How do we incorporate community partner voice into our assessment practices? In this Community Conversation, we hope to explore the tensions we experience in assessing in an inclusive manner. Presenters will share tools and resources and guide the group discussion. The purpose of this session is to explore assessment from a critical lens and to share ideas and resources. The objectives are for participants to examine their assessment practices and work together to share resources that could guide us toward inclusive assessment. The partners represented in the session are from UC Berkeley’s Public Service Center and Stanford University’s Haas Center for Public Service. This session builds from questions generated by two of the presenters when attending a Civic Center Convening at Cornell, participating in the Group on Evaluation, Assessment & Research. We hope the impact is we develop a network of people exploring this topic and sharing resources.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Wise

Andrea Wise

Associate Director, Public Service Center, Public Service Center, UC Berkeley
JJ

Joann (Jo) Wong

Program & Organizational Effectiveness Director, Haas Center for Public Service, Stanford University


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ 218
 
Thursday, March 7
 

10:00am

Building Competency & Exploring Diverse Pathways to Community Engaged Careers
In order to address complex issues and move toward a more inclusive, diverse, and equitable future, we need skilled and well-prepared civic engagement leaders and professionals. Have you ever wondered "How did that person get that position? What do I need to do to get that kind of job?" Our session will focus on conversation with a panel of community engagement professionals at different places in their careers, gleaning their thoughts on how to build a career in the higher education civic and community engagement field. In talking about our their career paths, presenters will discuss the competencies they developed in particular areas that are being covered by Campus Compact's new credential program for community engagement professionals. Each presenter will offer practical advice and share experiences, and time will be available for session attendees to ask tons of questions of the presenters. Come find out how to build your career and competency as a community and civic engagement professional.

Additional Information:
In choosing panelists for this session, we were intentional about bringing together practitioners from diverse backgrounds, each entering the field of “community engagement” from a unique trajectory. Each presenter will reflect on how their own positionality (as it relates to race, culture, class, gender, sexuality, professional status, etc.) has afforded them both opportunities and challenges as higher education community engagement professionals, and how they have negotiated questions of power, privilege, and difference in their collaborative work with partners both on and off campus. We will also ask them to explore the critical and ethical commitments that inspire them and whether (or to what extent) they have been able to root these commitments in their professional work and the activities they facilitate. Through these presentations and the Q&A that follows, we hope to be able to highlight that getting a job in the field does not require that one fit a particular mold, but rather that many ways of being and knowing bring individuals into the field and allow them to be effective in their roles advancing campus/community partnerships and democratic engagement. In fact, we will suggest that it is the diversity of experience and knowledges that make the entire field stronger.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Browning

Heather Browning

Program Director, Emerson Fellowship: Transforming Dialogue into Action, Stanford University
Heather O. Browning is an educator and thought leader with over 10 years of experience in roles related to institutional diversity and inclusion within higher education. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies from California State University, Long Beach, and Master... Read More →
avatar for Clayton Hurd

Clayton Hurd

Director, Professional Learning, Campus Compact
I'm a cultural anthropologist and public scholar with over 20 years experience developing and facilitating community-engaged learning and research programs at a range of higher education institutions. My areas of practice include faculty development, institutionalization of community... Read More →
PP

Pilar Pacheco

Center Director, CSU Channel Islands
AT

Andrea Tully

Community Engagement & Project Coordinator, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ C

10:00am

Finding Common Ground: Building Community and Understanding Across Political, Demographic, and Perceptual Borders
Comprised of singers from Mexico, the US, and around the world, Common Ground Voices “aims to generate a meaningful collaboration through music; to explore and create music of shared human values and aspirations; to contribute to community music as an exercise of non-violence; and to utilize music as a springboard for a meaningful discussion about social and political change, within the group as well as with the society in general.” In this workshop, participants will encounter a variety of multi-dimensional listening practices embedded into the very fabric of the ensemble’s work, including core activities meant to build empathy and invoke a vision of a yet-to-be world. These activities include a variety of active listening exercises, Theater of the Oppressed games, healing circles, and reflective dialogue. Perhaps most significantly, these activities invite participants to become present to themselves, each other, and the world. This presence could be seen as a spiritual practice of connecting, a making space for genuine relationships to be made.


Speakers
avatar for Emilie Amrein

Emilie Amrein

Assistant Professor of Music, University of San Diego
Professor Amrein conducts the USD Choral Scholars and teaches courses on the intersection of music and social justice movements. She is the artistic director of Peregrine Music, an arts and education nonprofit organization committed to engaging communities in meaningful dialogue about... Read More →
avatar for André de Quadros

André de Quadros

Professor of Music and Chair, Music Education Department, Boston University
Professor de Quadros directs four choirs: the Manado State University Choir (Indonesia), Common Ground Voices (Israeli /Palestinian/international), VOICES 21C (Boston), and Muslim Choral Ensemble (Sri Lanka). In addition, he leads choral projects in Massachusetts prisons. His life... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ Theatre

10:00am

Her Place in the World: Educational Opportunity for Incarcerated Young People
Prison dehumanizes, not as a side effect but as a central function. A child who is forcibly removed from home and society and placed inside a cage receives a powerful message about herself and her place in the world.
(Nell Bernstein, Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison, p.33)

On any given day in this country, 60,000 people under the age of 18 are incarcerated in detention, jails and prisons. By locking kids away, we are taking away their identity, their freedom, and minimizing their existence.  What could it look like if we did things differently? What if we could send a different and more hopeful message to young people who are locked up? What, if anything, is the role of colleges and universities, especially public institutions, to those in local juvenile detention centers, jails and prisons? In keeping with the conference theme, this session will examine how we can reach beyond barriers, and in this case, physical barriers of steel doors and razor wire, to think more inclusively about our work.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Smith Arthur

Deborah Smith Arthur

2019 Engaged Scholar Award Recipient, Portland State University
Deborah Smith Arthur, JD., is a vigorous and steadfast advocate for youth justice and for promoting educational access for people who are incarcerated and formerly incarcerated. Her teaching at Portland State University over the past 15 years has revolved around community based learning... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ G

10:00am

Using the SLQAT, A Research-Based Tool for Supporting and Determining the Quality of Service-Learning Courses
Through guided use of the tool, this interactive workshop will introduce attendees to the rationale, development, and potential uses of the Service-Learning Quality Assessment Tool (SLQAT), developed by researchers from the University of Georgia and the University of Minnesota. Research has identified many best practices for developing and teaching service-learning courses. However, our field has lacked a consistent, standardized tool for assessing whether a given course incorporates the essential elements; the SLQAT was developed in response to this need. The SLQAT has 28 "Essential Elements" which are important for quality student learning outcomes in academic service-learning courses from any discipline, and can be used for research purposes as well as for faculty development and course construction. After an overview of the process, decisions, and development of the SLQAT, the session engages participants in reviewing and using the tool, and in how to reliability rate key elements. Workshop participants will use the SLQAT with a sample course, and will be invited to provide feedback on the protocols, instrument, and potential uses on their campus, including participation in the next stage of piloting.

Speakers
AF

Andrew Furco

Associate Vice President/Professor, University of Minnesota
1. Senior leadership and administrative issues regarding the advancement of community and civic engagement in higher education. 2. The latest research findings on the impacts of community engagement on students, faculty, institutions, and communities.
avatar for Laurel Hirt

Laurel Hirt

Director, Center for Community-Engaged Learning, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
avatar for Isabel Lopez

Isabel Lopez

na, University of Minnesota
I'm a doctoral candidate in the Educational Psychology program at the University of Minnesota. My areas of study include community-engagement, and achievement motivation in higher education.
avatar for Paul Matthews

Paul Matthews

Associate Director, Office of Service-Learning, University of Georgia


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ A

11:30am

Engaged Graduate Education in the Research University
This session will describe findings from an interdisciplinary learning community that convened in the Spring of 2018 to explore graduate-level service-learning and community engagement (SLCE) at a large research university. Members of the “Engaged Graduate Education” Learning Community (“EGE”), comprised of thirteen graduate students and three service-learning program administrators (“members”), met monthly and completed independent research projects on the state of SLCE in their departments and/or fields. Throughout the semester-long EGE, we utilized a mixed-methods “values-engaged assessment” framework (Bandy et. al., 2016) to analyze discussion notes, member assignments, and final projects, and to identify the dominant norms and values that might encourage or deter graduate students from participating in SLCE. Though values vary in important ways by degree program, we found that, for the most part, these norms limit graduate SLCE in pervasive and substantive ways. In this session, we will discuss our findings and propose both strategic and tactical (Hubrig, McWain, Meade & Shah, 2017) approaches for supporting graduate SLCE in research universities similar to our own with the goal of shifting dominant perceptions of graduate education and creating large-scale change. Such strategies for change include identifying allies, building communication channels, and making use of existing institutional structures.

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Bernstein-Sierra

Samantha Bernstein-Sierra

Assist. Dir. of Research and Academic Affairs, USC Joint Educational Project
avatar for Susan C. Harris

Susan C. Harris

Executive Director, USC Joint Educational Project


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ E

2:30pm

Leveraging Learning and Leadership through Student Engagement Scholars: Transformations of the Self in Community
Outcomes from college students (n=151) at 30 colleges who participated in a semester-long California Campus Compact Community Engagement Student Fellowship indicate as a result of the experience enriched academic and professional competencies including expanded knowledge, empathetic understanding, psycho-motor abilities, and leadership skills. Fellowship students described their experiences as “capacity-building”, “educationally-empowering”, and “career-solidifying”. In turn, these facets of inspiration and purpose coalesced into students’ increased sense of community agency and efficacy—having the skills and motivation to continue to transform themselves and others. Moreover, students articulated that what differentiated this community engagement from other forms of experiential and collaborative learning is that the Fellowship held them accountable for advancing social responsibility. In other words,the impact of a Scholars program is that the power of knowledge is realized when publicly enacted. The purpose is to present an overview of the CESF Fellows that can be easily replicated on any campus. The objectives are to highlight this Low-investment and Low-infrastructure strategy by detailed sharing of best practices including opportunities for brainstorming next steps for those who want to implement a similar program. The panel presentation is a partnership of the program director, campus director, Fellowship student, and assessment consultant.

Speakers
CC

Christine Cress

Professor, PACE Program, Graduate School of Education, Portland State University
avatar for Piper McGinley

Piper McGinley

Associate Director, California Campus Compact
avatar for Lezlee Matthews

Lezlee Matthews

Director Community-Based Learning, Loyola Marymount University
Community-Based Learning
UN

Uma Nicole

M.A. Bioethics Candidate, Class of 2019, Loyola Marymount University


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ E

4:00pm

Transforming Volunteerism to Social Impact in Conservative Utah
“You know what kind of community surrounds UVU, right?!” When we told our in-state colleagues our plans to transform Utah Valley University’s Volunteer & Service-Learning Center into the Center for Social Impact, they thought we were crazy—and that it couldn’t be done. UVU is located in the heart of a very conservative county in a very conservative state, and is now home to the Center for Social Impact. With our updated mission of "Driving social impact by connecting students and community," we now promote a framework of diverse pathways for active citizenship that goes beyond volunteerism and service-learning. By combining Stanford’s Public Service Pathways and Break Away’s Active Citizen Continuum, we design programs, initiatives, and collaborations that move students from pathway entry points to more substantial community learning experiences. This storytelling session will detail the journey we took to realize this transformation, including the development of our strategic framework, getting campus buy-in and formal approval, and our plans moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Amber Hendrickson

Amber Hendrickson

Community Partnerships Coordinator, Utah Valley University
avatar for Summer Valente

Summer Valente

Director, Utah Valley University
JW

Jonathan Westover

Associate Professor of Organizational Leadership; Director, Academic Service Learning, Utah Valley University


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ C

4:00pm

Validating and Enhancing Your Competencies as a Community Engagement Professional: Campus Compact's New CEP Credentialing Program
In the spring of 2019, Campus Compact begins a full roll out its new Credentialing Program for Community Engagement Professionals (CEPs). The role of this conference session is to inform attendees about the origins, purpose, development, and structure of the program as well as to share information about how one can apply for various micro-credentials and work toward earning a broader certification. The session will include lessons learned from the pilot project (scheduled for fall 2018) and will leave ample time for attendees to ask questions about all aspects of the program. The session also provides an important opportunity for Campus Compact to receive feedback from the field about the content, development, marketing, and implementation of the new credentialing program.

Speakers
avatar for Clayton Hurd

Clayton Hurd

Director, Professional Learning, Campus Compact
I'm a cultural anthropologist and public scholar with over 20 years experience developing and facilitating community-engaged learning and research programs at a range of higher education institutions. My areas of practice include faculty development, institutionalization of community... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ B

4:00pm

Votes and Ballots - Gamifying Voter Engagement Planning
The purpose of this workshop is to introduce a framework to institutionalize democratic engagement equitably across a campus community. Facilitators will cover the Strengthening American Democracy template for writing democratic engagement plans and its sections, Leadership, Commitment, Landscape, Goals, Strategy, Reporting, and Evaluation. Facilitators and participants will review Votes and Ballots, which has turned the template into worksheets, a strategy poster, and tactic cards. Facilitators will highlight issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the planning process and materials, such as using the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE) to identify politically-marginalized segments of the campus community by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and field of study. Participants will leave with the knowledge and resources necessary to facilitate the Votes and Ballots activity themselves. Strengthening American Democracy was developed by the Students Learn Students Vote Coalition including All In, AASCU’s American Democracy Project, Campus Compact’s The Democracy Commitment, Campus Vote Project, NASPA, and Young Invincibles. Votes and Ballots was developed by Democracy Works and Maryland Institute College of Art and was field tested at 7 conveings in Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, Florida, Virginia, and North Carolina. Facilitators will also reference Institutionalizing Voter Engagement, A Guide to Developing and Adopting Handbook Language.

Votes & Ballots materials are available here.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Burns

Mike Burns

Director, Campus Vote Project
avatar for Anjelica Smith

Anjelica Smith

TurboVote Campus Outreach Lead, Democracy Works
Anjelica Smith is Campus Outreach Lead for TurboVote at Democracy Works, a nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to the idea that voting should fit the way we live. In her role as Campus Outreach Lead she works to sustain and grow the TurboVote higher education program... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ G
 
Friday, March 8
 

9:30am

Building Community: 50 years of Service-Learning Together
Combining pedagogy and civic engagement did not arise from a single theorist but rather from the experiences of diverse educators, philanthropists, and activists. It developed when young people actively supported equal rights and opposed a war on foreign soil. It blossomed without a governing body or any public legislation. “Service-learning” advocates first convened in Atlanta in 1969, 50 years ago and 20 years prior to the formation of Campus Compact. In those early days most service-learning efforts were undertaken in spite of the will of university faculty and administrators rather than with their support. Service-learning professionals battled to win the hearts, minds and budgets of highly traditional, resistant institutions. Key to success was the strong, nurturing, critical community that came together through the National Society for Internships and Experiential Education (NSIEE), which enabled members to lean on one another for ideas, challenges and inspiration. This networked community enabled the work to become accepted as critical to higher education and civic engagement. This session builds upon and promotes this community by enabling participants to engage in one-on-one interviews that bring together the field’s pioneers, its new voices, and community partnes to explore/share motivations, convictions and questions about their goals and practice.

Speakers
TA

Tammara Anderson

Associate Dean of Experiental and Applied Learning, USC Dornslife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
avatar for Dick Cone

Dick Cone

Retired director JEP/USC, USC Joint Educational Project
I have been engaged in servcice-learning since 1976 and have witneswsed the growth of the movement warts and all. I am interested in the reflection policy and attending to our on-going weaknesses.
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

Vice President for Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →
TS

Tim Stanton

Senior Engaged Scholar, Ravensong Associates, and Director Emeritus of Stanford’s Overseas Studies Program in Cape Town


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ I

9:30am

Self-Care & Reflective Practices: Do We Really? Can We Really?
According to the National College Health Assessment, 40.2% of students suffer from depression on a nationwide basis. Additionally, 1 in 12 students has a suicide plan. A 2016 Nonprofit Employment Practices Survey reported that turnover rates in nonprofit staffing continue to grow. A study from Columbia, Harvard, and Georgetown found that “the busier a person appeared, the more important they were deemed,” lending to the “Cult of Busyness” that seems to have erupted in our culture. Each of these statistics and findings are indicative of the day to day that staff members, educators, community partners, and students face. They are overworked, overcommitted, exhausted, depressed, stressed, etc. In our session, we hope to discuss the role that institutions of higher education play in creating this culture (examples: exceedingly high expectations students need to meet to gain college acceptance, asking staff/faculty to do more with less) and what role they can play in shifting our culture to support a more holistic picture of success and wealth. Furthermore, we hope to crowdsource real ways to engage in intentional self-care and reflective practices and advocate for such opportunities to administrators and other power brokers.

Speakers
TB

Taylan Bennett-Parker

Special Projects Coordinator, California State University, Fresno
avatar for Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Assistant Director, Richter Center for Community Engagement and Service-Learning at Fresno State


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ A

9:30am

What About Alumni?
Despite ample evidence that service-learning enables students to understand the power of their voices and actions, many educators remain dubious about the benefits and utility of this pedagogical approach. Thus, there is a need demonstrate the long term effects of service-learning. Through an exploratory qualitative study, the Center for Community Learning & Leadership at San Jose State University endeavored to elucidate the perceptions of alumni who participated in service-learning as students to examine whether their experiences influenced their career pathways and to understand the mechanisms of this influence. During summer 2018, snowball sampling was used to identify service-learning alumni who currently work at local agencies contributing to the public good. The alumni were individually interviewed by our California Campus Compact Community Engagement Student Fellow. The interview transcriptions provided a rich set of data to identify common themes in alumni experiences. Initial results suggest that service-learning improved alumni skills in the areas of: public speaking; time management; communication; leadership; decision-making; organization; and teaching. The results also indicate that service-learning provided an opportunity for alumni to gain insight into their strengths and use their insights to identify and obtain jobs focused on equity and civic engagement.

Speakers
EK

Elena Klaw

Faculty Director, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
MM

Marizela Maciel

CACC Community Engagement Student Fellow, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
AT

Andrea Tully

Community Engagement & Project Coordinator, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
BY

Brianna Young

Research Assistant, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ G

11:00am

Building Community Connections with Music! Impact and Engagement Through Music Nonprofit and Service-Learning Courses
The arts, by their nature, embrace diverse ways of knowing. Today’s musicians must be able to create their own audiences and community-based musical endeavors in order to communicate, learn, grow, and maximize their creative opportunities. This workshop examines the impact of two community engagement-related music courses. Music Studies Integration is a Service-Learning course in which students develop group projects which meet the needs of a community partner. Nonprofit Music has students building hypothetical nonprofit organizations in teams, addressing various aspects and functions of management. It is rare for a university to offer this particular combination of coursework. Alumni have gone on to employment with nonprofits and have cited these courses as being essential to their growth. We will present a case study on impactful service-residencies involving the Lennon Bus in 2014, 2017, and upcoming in 2019. The John Lennon Educational Tour Bus is a nonprofit organization featuring a state-of-the-art mobile audio and video recording studio which tours the United States promoting music education. Interactive discussions will address audience questions on effective partnership building and will brainstorm possibilities for student community engagement. The presenters are key participants, from Cal Poly Pomona and Pomona Unified School District, in the coursework and residencies.

Speakers
DK

Dave Kopplin

Professor, Music Department, Cal Poly Pomona
avatar for Michael Millar

Michael Millar

Lecturer, Cal Poly Pomona
avatar for Laura Solis

Laura Solis

Program Administrator for Accountability and Assessment, Pomona Unified School District


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ C

11:00am

Connecting the Work using the Civic Minded Graduate Framework
The Civic Leadership Workshop Series was born out of a partnership between Community Action Volunteers in Education, the Wildcat Leadership Institute - both programs of the within Student Affairs, and the Office of Civic Engagement which is housed in Undergraduate Education at Chico State. Motivating this partnership was an interest in connecting the work of volunteering with academic programs and also to pilot the promotion of the civic-minded graduate framework as a model for the campus. The Series consisted of five, faculty-led and facilitated workshops focusing on the concept of the civic-minded graduate, an emerging concept linking student’s identity, educational and civic experiences. Following each session, students were required to complete a brief assessment consisting of 4-5 learning outcomes as well as a reflection essay based on specific prompts by the faculty facilitator. An average of 35 students attended each session. Program evaluations indicate that overall the pilot program was effective in supporting students to consider how their academic work connects with both their community work and their developing identities – thus, the civic-minded graduate. Students shared deep insights and demonstrated excellent critical reflection on the concepts and ideas presented. An enhanced program will launch in the fall of 2018.

Speakers
CC

cathryn carkhuff

CAVE Program Coordinator, Associated Students CSU, Chico
avatar for Susan Roll

Susan Roll

Director of Civic Engagement, California State University, Chico
avatar for Ann Schwab

Ann Schwab

Program Director, California State University, Chico
An alumna of Community Action Volunteers in Education’s (CAVE) Big Brother Big Sister program while an undergraduate at Chico State, Ann joined CAVE’s professional staff in 1999 and was named Program Director in 2015. CAVE’s mission is to provide Chico State students with meaningful... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ B

11:00am

Finding Common Understanding and Purpose Through Dialogue
A Deliberative Dialogue Forum brings people together in a small gathering to deliberate about challenging public issues. The process is guided by a neutral moderator and a discussion guide that presents multiple approaches to addressing the problem. Deliberative Dialogue provides an effective framework for mutual understanding and a common purpose that allows people to discuss difficult issues, weigh options, and ultimately take action. This immersive moderator training includes an understanding of deliberation, an overview of the four components of a forum, and engagement in a practice forum. Participants receive strategies and sample questions for moderating a forum, as well as tips and tools for effective moderating. The goal is for participants to be able to take this knowledge back to their institutions or communities to use deliberative dialogues to bring people together. Since 2013, NC Campus Compact has promoted the use of deliberative dialogue as a tool for campuses to build citizens and community. We have trained nearly 500 faculty, staff, and students from 47 colleges and universities, plus community members, to moderate a deliberative dialogue forum.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Garvin

Leslie Garvin

Executive Director, North Carolina Campus Compact


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ G

11:00am

You Are Not Alone! Best Practices for Engaging University Students in Effective Experiential Learning Experiences as Reading and Math Tutors in K – 6 Schools through Service-Learning Programs and the America Reads/Counts Initiative
The purpose of this session is to gather those who are mobilizing university students as reading and math tutors in K – 6 schools surrounding their colleges/universities, or who are in the beginning stages of developing such programs. The main objectives of this session are to introduce a shared on-line platform created collaboratively last year by over 20 California campuses doing this kind of work as a means to share resources and gather new ideas. We also invite campuses across the region into the network to provide support and camaraderie for all who provide these meaningful experiential learning opportunities to university students who serve surrounding campus communities. The partners for these programs include higher education institutions and their civically-minded students who gain meaningful work experiences while addressing a social need. In addition to student impact, our community partners – the K-6 schools and students served – are greatly impacted. The impact for school partners is individualized academic support for K-6 learners. The impact for university students is in an opportunity to learn and grow through service they provide K-6 children in need. Impact for session participants is entry into a supportive network with resources to draw from and add to.

Speakers
avatar for Dick Cone

Dick Cone

Retired director JEP/USC, USC Joint Educational Project
I have been engaged in servcice-learning since 1976 and have witneswsed the growth of the movement warts and all. I am interested in the reflection policy and attending to our on-going weaknesses.
avatar for Chris Fiorentino

Chris Fiorentino

Director. Jan and Bud Richter Center for Community Engagement and Service-Learning, California State University, Fresno
TK

Tina Koneazny

JEP ReadersPlus Graduate Assistant, University of Southern California
avatar for Allina Mojarro

Allina Mojarro

Community Education Outreach Coordinator, UC Santa Barbara
avatar for Renee Scott

Renee Scott

Director Early Education Programs, Stanford University
Renee has been an educator for 20 years, having served as an elementary school teacher, a professional development teacher-leader, and a teacher-candidate educator/supervisor. As a graduate student, she studied the role of vision in new teacher development and word-reading instruction... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ D