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March 6-8, 2019
University of San Diego

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Wednesday, March 6
 

7:15am

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from the Best Western Hacienda Plus Hotel to the conference site at USD during the hours posted above.

Wednesday March 6, 2019 7:15am - 9:45am
Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel

7:30am

Conference Registration
Wednesday March 6, 2019 7:30am - 4:30pm
KIPJ Rotunda

8:30am

A Focus on Place: A New Paradigm for Community Engagement in Higher Education
Overview: We live in challenging and changing times. Major disruptions in our economic, social and political structures have led to questions about the purpose and meaning of many of our institutions including our colleges and universities. Perhaps more than ever universities and communities need each other to address the challenges we face. Unfortunately, our traditional approaches to community engagement in higher education, while having many strong merits, are not fully capable of responding to the enormity of the challenges we face.  

The emerging model of place-based community engagement offers universities a powerful strategy to attain greater impact in their local communities and also on their campuses. 

This interactive workshops will draw upon lessons learned from a new book Place-Based Community Engagement in Higher Education to present the benefits and challenges of this emerging approach to connecting campus and community.  The session will include a discussion with several leaders of place-based efforts and a practical hands-on exploration of how an institution and its community might further pursue the place-based paradigm. The workshop will particularly explore how focusing on a geographic area shifts the balance of engagement towards an equal emphasis on campus and community impact and also invites a much deeper exploration of issues of power, privilege and race.

Speakers
avatar for Karin Cotterman

Karin Cotterman

Director of Engage San Francisco, University of San Francisco
Karin Cotterman directs Engage San Francisco, an intentional, systematic and transformative university-community initiative focused on achieving community-identified outcomes supporting children, youth and families in the Western Addition through student learning, research and teaching... Read More →
avatar for Kent Koth

Kent Koth

Executive Director, Seattle University Center for Community Engagement
Kent Koth is the founding director of the Seattle University Center for Community Engagement. Through this role Kent leads the Seattle University Youth Initiative, a long-term commitment by Seattle University faculty, staff and students from all disciplines to join with parents, the... Read More →
avatar for John Loggins

John Loggins

Director of Community Engaged Learning, University of San Diego
John Loggins the Director of Community Engaged Learning in the Karen and Tom Mulvaney Center for Community, Awareness and Social Action at the University of San Diego. John works collaboratively as part of a team responsible for ensuring that USD is a global and national leader as... Read More →
JP

Jennifer Pigza, Ph.D.

Director, Saint Mary's College of California
EY

Erica Yamamura

Program Director and Associate Professor, Student Development Administration, Seattle University


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ D

8:30am

Community Colleges as Civic Power Plants: Generating, Harnessing, and Spreading Civic Power
Overview: Inspired by Eric Liu’s You Are More Powerful Than You Think and his notion of civic power, this interactive workshop will introduce the concept of community colleges as “Civic Power Plants” generating power in the civic life of their students and campuses.  How can community colleges harness their true public purpose by educating for democracy and sending it out to making a difference in the civic lives of the community that they serve?  This workshop will feature an immersive role-playing exercise, a presentation on model programs from a diversity of community colleges, and a brainstorm/action planning session. ​

Speakers
avatar for Verdis Robinson

Verdis Robinson

Director, Community College Engagement, Campus Compact


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ E

8:30am

Connecting Indigenous and Western Knowledge Systems for Climate Mitigation and Resilience and for Student Success
Overview: This workshop is an opportunity to experience an implementation of the conference theme by addressing climate change and seeking new strategies for student success. Incorporating multiple ways of knowing, being, and aspiring we specifically work towards a just, equitable, and sustainable future for us all. Humankind needs to include all the knowledge and tools that we can gather from indigenous and “Western” knowledge systems in order to equip ourselves to meet the grand challenges that impact our collective future.

This pre-conference workshop synergizes multiple approaches strengthening high-impact research practices and pedagogies. Brief presentations by participants in the ongoing SENCER (Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities) project, “Transcending Barriers to Success” (TBS), will address the urgency of dealing with climate change locally and globally, based on interdisciplinary research and pedagogies in a collaboration across disciplines, campuses, and communities. Following the framing presentations, workshop participants will have opportunities to (1) share current project ideas, challenges, opportunities, and outcomes, and (2) develop a wider, deeper, and stronger network of higher education-indigenous community connections within the western region and beyond. The pre-conference will include time to learn from each other and inspire formal and informal education by together outlining practical, usable projects, and/or research and course designs.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Franco

Robert Franco

Director, Institutional Effectiveness, Kapi'olani Community College and University of Hawai'i
Dr. Robert Franco is a cultural anthropologist whose research focuses on contemporary Hawaiian, Samoan, and Pacific Islander sociocultural issues. As Director of the Office for Institutional Effectiveness (OFIE), he supervises institutional researchers who conduct quantitative studies... Read More →
avatar for Ulla Hassager

Ulla Hassager

PhD, CSS Director of Civic Engagement, University of Hawai'i at Manoa
PhD in Anthropology (specialized in the Pacific), Director of Civic Engagement for the UHM College of Social Sciences, and Department of Ethnic Studies faculty. As the college leader of civic and community engagement, I spearhead efforts to expand the level of civic engagement... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ F

8:30am

Contemplating the Monumental Murals: Chicano Park as a Site of Disjunctures, Meaning, Reconciliation, and Resistance
Overview: Join Alberto López Pulido, Professor and founding chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of San Diego (USD) and lead for the Logan Heights Documentation Project as well as the Turning Wheels Project, on a path towards making sense and reconciling the critical separation between who we claim to be in relation to who others claim we are. Participants will collectively enter the sacred space of Chicano Park and encounter its eighty-eight monumental murals as contemplative sites for acknowledging disjunctures in our own lives and utilize contemplative practices to acquire meaning and reconciliation. We will evoke the practices and pedagogy of recall, reflect and occupy.  In addition, we will define and introduce the concepts of situated contemplation and trans-generational knowledge as unique pedagogies and practices for working effectively with people of color: our students, colleagues, local communities, and ourselves.
 
*Please note:  There is a limit to the number of people who can attend this pre-conference workshop.  Participants will be admitted on a first-come, first-serve basis. Additionally, this pre-conference will begin with a walk, so wear comfortable shoes and be prepared to be mobile during the pre-conference.  This pre-conference is wheelchair accessible.

Speakers
AL

Alberto López Pulido

Professor, University of San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ A

8:30am

Dialogue Tools for Addressing Community Conflict & Transforming Relationships
Overview: Dialogue is a method for creating new understanding within groups and communities in ways that empower communities to collaboratively develop solutions to challenges facing them. This three-hour session will focus on introducing and applying the Sustained Dialogue Institute's concept of relationship and five stage dialogue to action process, both of which developed out of former Assistant Secretary of State Harold Saunders’ work in international peace negotiations. During the session participants will have opportunities to learn about the Sustained Dialogue model, to practice applying it to a conflict on their campus or in their community, and to explore processes leading to dehumanization within conflicts. Participants will leave with new tools and potential action steps for addressing conflicts in their community.  

Speakers
avatar for Michaela Grenier

Michaela Grenier

Program Director, SDCN, Sustained Dialogue Institute
The Sustained Dialogue Institute helps citizens around the world to transform their relationships and to design and implement sustainable change processes. The Sustained Dialogue Campus Network (SDCN) first began to form as a student-created branch of SDI in 1999 and has since grown... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ B

8:30am

Exploring the Nature of our Partnerships: Institution-Wide Data Collection on Community Engagement
Overview: We invite teams of engagement administrators, leaders, and advocates to join us in developing strategies to identify, collect, interpret, and use community engagement metrics.

Through large group presentations, small group discussion, and individual team work, you will:
  • Share individual and institutional motivations for and uses of community engagement data
  • Understand the contexts which increase the need for institutions to define and describe community engagement
  • Learn with two campuses as they use Collaboratory to collect, analyze, and visualize related data (including examples of data outputs for discussion)
  • Explore strategies for using data as a basis for measuring outcomes and impact across faculty/staff, students, community partners, and institutions
  • Consider how to create opportunities to increase the rigor of scholarship on the collective activities and impact of community-higher education partnerships
  • Review implications of this data for communications and messaging while maintaining best practices and standards
  • Examine how data enhances other institutional functions, e.g., the ability to convene and refer individuals and organizations across sectors working toward aligned agendas

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Keyne

Lisa Keyne

Chief Strategy Officer, Treetop Commons, LLC
avatar for Lauren Wendling

Lauren Wendling

Customer Specialist, Treetop Commons, LLC
avatar for Barbara Holland

Barbara Holland

Strategy Advisor, CUMU
avatar for Emily Janke

Emily Janke

Director, ICEE, UNC Greensboro
institutionalizing community engagement tracking and measuring community engagement across an institution or system recognizing community engagement in promotion and tenure community-university partnerships
avatar for Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski

Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski

Associate Provost, Weber State University
MS

Maria Silva

Director, Neighborhood and Community Partnerships, University of San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 8:30am - 1:00pm
KIPJ C

12:00pm

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from the Best Western Hacienda Plus Hotel to the conference site at USD during the hours posted above.

Wednesday March 6, 2019 12:00pm - 2:15pm
Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel

1:00pm

Conference Welcome & Framing
Speakers
avatar for Elaine Ikeda

Elaine Ikeda

Executive Director, California Campus Compact
Since 2000, Elaine Ikeda has served as the Executive Director of California CampusCompact (CACC). She has over 20 years of experience supervising volunteers in higher education, conducting research on service-learning, volunteerism and community service, and disseminating service-learning... Read More →
avatar for Leroy Morishita

Leroy Morishita

President and CACC Board Chair, CSU East Bay
avatar for Jim Harris

Jim Harris

President, University of San Diego
James T. Harris III, D.Ed., became the University of San Diego’s fourth president on August 3, 2015. The University of San Diego is one of only 44 universities in the world designated as an Ashoka U Changemaker campus. Throughout his academic career, Dr. Harris has worked closely... Read More →
avatar for Mila Buckland

Mila Buckland

Curriculum & Training Manager, Campus Compact of Oregon
avatar for Tshombe Brown

Tshombe Brown

Program Manager for Community Partnerships, University of Portland
avatar for Andrew Seligsohn

Andrew Seligsohn

President, Campus Compact
Andrew J. Seligsohn is president of Campus Compact, a national coalition of 1100 colleges and universities dedicated to the public purposes of higher education.  As president, Seligsohn has focused on strengthening Campus Compact’s support for deep partnerships between campuses... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
KIPJ Theatre

2:00pm

Break
Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:00pm - 2:15pm
KIPJ Rotunda

2:15pm

When the Firestorm Transforms: Becoming the Community Partner
This interactive discussion session explores how crisis compels the crossing of borders and lessons for when there is no crisis. In 2017, the Tubbs fire, which grew to be the most destructive in CA history, burned through several neighborhoods in the Sonoma County seat of Santa Rosa and came within 3 miles of the Sonoma State campus. It destroyed the homes of our president, hundreds of employees, students, and community partners. Overnight, the university changed from being a service provider to being a recipient of service. The arbitrary and false barriers between “the University” and “the community” evaporated during the crisis. The fires didn’t respect the borders of the campus, the county, or city lines. Our interconnectedness with each other and with our natural and man-made surroundings was apparent. An ethic of care brought all of us together and no conversation began without authentic check-ins for months. It became clear that while the fire doesn't discriminate based on race, ethnicity, or income, power, privilege, and positionality mattered in the aftermath. Listening, acknowledging, and respecting voices or conversations that have been and are marginalized became the primary way to support healing while simultaneously, more academic approaches sprung up.

Speakers
avatar for Merith Weisman

Merith Weisman

Director of Community Engagement & Strategic Initiatives, Sonoma State University


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ F

2:15pm

Learn, Engage, Lead! Student Leader Perspectives on Civic Engagement at Salt Lake Community College
The purpose of this session is to share the model and practices of an experiential, cohort-based student leadership program in a community college setting through the perspective of active student leaders. Student Leaders in Civic Engagement (SLiCE) at Salt Lake Community College is the most intensive leadership experience offered through the Thayne Center for Service & Learning. SLiCE Leads are active on campus and in the community for 15-20 hours weekly throughout the fall and spring semesters, with additional commitments over the summer. Foundational components of the SLiCE Program include: - The selection of an issue area as their perspective for exploring the year and direct engagement with a reciprocal community partner. - The provision of as much stackable funding for students as eligible. - A student directed experience that aligns with their career and academic trajectory. - A non-hierarchical student leadership cohort that promotes relationship building, civic responsibility, and teamwork. Through a panel-style conversation, SLiCE Leads will reflect on the importance of being involved in community as part of their community college experience and how they cultivate balance as a whole student. SLiCE Leads will also review their list of recommendations for community colleges developing civic engagement leadership programming.

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Collins

Samantha Collins

Service Leadership Coordinator, Salt Lake Community College
avatar for Colton Judd

Colton Judd

SLiCE Food Lead, Salt Lake Community College
Colton is currently working towards his Business degree at SLCC. He plans to subsequently transfer to Westminster College,double majoring in International Business.Colton recognizes himself as a member of a larger social fabric, he is willing to see the moral and civic dimensions... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Paredes

Samantha Paredes

SLiCE Literacy and Education Lead, Salt Lake Community College
avatar for Mylee Parkinson

Mylee Parkinson

SLiCE Youth Development Lead, Salt Lake Community College
avatar for Desirae Sizemore

Desirae Sizemore

SLiCE Health Lead, Salt Lake Community College
avatar for Angel Zevallos

Angel Zevallos

SLiCE Urban Development and Arts Lead, Salt Lake Community College


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ 217A

2:15pm

Express Yourself: Creating a Civic/Community Engagement Mix Tape
What are the boundary-spanning ways in which community partners, practitioners in the field, and community members think about, define, and are motivated by civic and community engagement (CCE)? How we define CCE influences our work, our community partnerships, and the lens through which we understand critical issues. In this session we will listen to songs selected by participants, dialogue about creating meaning through music, and bring participants closer together in a shared understanding of CCE. We will do this by: 1) Picking a song - something that speaks to how you think of civic and/or community engagement, or a song you were exposed to at an important time in your life, or one that you feel defines you or your generation's way of thinking about CCE. 2) Showing up - share your stories and listen to others share stories about their song and perspective. We will play songs for the group, have participants share the meaning behind their selection, and then engage in conversations about how meaning-making through music can strengthen the work we do by sharing it in different forms to different audiences. 3) Enjoying the music - all participant selections will be combined into a mix tape (let's be real...it's a playlist) to be shared electronically.

Speakers
AA

Alisha Andrews

AmeriCorps Program Director, Campus Compact of the Mountain West
avatar for Stephanie Schooley

Stephanie Schooley

Executive Director, Campus Compact of the Mountain West
Stephanie Schooley became the Executive Director of CCMW in 2010 after serving with the organization since 2001. Over the course of Stephanie’s career with Campus Compact, she developed and implemented national service and community-engagement programming, expanded CCMW's partnerships, brought... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ 215

2:15pm

Let's Talk About It: Building Community through Dialogue
Dialogue is a structured way to discuss sensitive topics that typically elicit divergent perspectives and opinions. While this approach is built on a tried and true practice, its application is innovative: UC San Diego has used it as a tool to teach students how to address controversial topics, as well as learn about and appreciate different beliefs and ways of being. As one student noted, “It’s rare to have moments like these where we set aside our busy schedules and actively talk about things challenging our society.” Through storytelling, participants build empathy, respect, and mutual understanding. This session will use storytelling in the form of dialogue circles as a tool to build community. This session will introduce and demonstrate ways to use dialogue circles to hear the stories that shape communities, understand community needs, and build inclusivity. Through participation in a community building dialogue on “Borders,” attendees will be immersed in the circle process; what drives this approach and the challenges that come with it. Participants will learn about the history of dialogue circles, its foundations in restorative justice and the structure of UCSD’s program. At the close, participants will reflect on and discuss the process, and brainstorm applications.

Speakers
KB

Katy Brecht

Communication & Leadership Program Coordinator, UC San Diego
avatar for Catherine Lettieri

Catherine Lettieri

Community Service Program Coordinator, UC San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ 219

2:15pm

Building Collaboration and Partnership through Community-Based Research Projects
LMU has implemented an Engaged Learning requirement into our core curriculum, which means that all LMU students take a course where their educational work applies to a real world issue. Faculty members, however, struggle with creating meaningful projects within their classes that benefit both community organizations and students. Our session will address how LMU faculty are collaborating with one community organization, Women Organizing for Justice and Opportunity (WOJO) to develop a fruitful partnership where students’ work help meet its organizational needs. WOJO is part of A New Way of Life (ANWOL) Women’s reentry program that supports women who are returning into their communities after incarceration. Over the past year, faculty at LMU and members of WOJO have met together to identify strategies for collaboration such that our courses could support their work. Our session will share how our collaborative work across multiple courses is developing to support WOJO, while also meeting LMU’s goal of being an engaged campus. Additionally, we will describe our engagement process, highlight the lessons learned, and identify next steps for this collaboration.

Speakers
DC

Deanna Cooke

Director of Engaged Learning Clinical Asst. Professor, Loyola Marymount University
TJ

Tiffany Johnson

Co-Director, A New Way of Life Reentry Program
avatar for Anna Muraco

Anna Muraco

Associate Professor, Loyola Marymount University
KP

Kyra Pearson

Associate Professor, Loyola Marymount University


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ I

2:15pm

Same Same But Different: Holding the Paradox of Identity
In our work, we often see students showing up for social justice conversations for the issues that they are most passionate about, and sometimes, most impacted by personally. Yet, how do we invite people to see beyond their personal identities and stories? Furthermore, how do we build coalitions and authentically engage across difference -- be it race, class, culture, nationality, politics, and religion-- for the shared pursuit of a just and equitable world? This year, the Student Affairs Division at USD underwent an organizational restructure to better attend to these questions. In this presentation, we will share our learning from this new partnership which brought together multiple identity-based spaces. We will begin by sharing personal stories of what this new way of organizing meant for our work. We will engage in an activity used to support student leaders within this new partnership to hold a more deeply intersectional and holistic understanding of themselves, their communities, and the world. Finally, we will ask: what is difficult about this type of coalition-building? As we explore this question, we will outline key paradoxes and tensions that we all need to develop the capacity to hold so to better work ‘beyond borders’.

Speakers
avatar for Delia Contreras

Delia Contreras

Graduate Assistant, University of San Diego
avatar for Stacey Williams

Stacey Williams

Associate Director, The Commons, University of San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ 218

2:15pm

Validating Culturally Diverse Students: Facilitating Success Through Community Engagement, Service Learning, and Mentoring
Using a Cultural Validation Theory framework, educational leaders from California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) explore student learning within the community as a high-impact practice with demonstrated successes for academic achievement outcomes. Cultural Validation Theory asserts that students are more successful in achieving deep learning as well as improved retention and graduation levels when they receive affirmation about their unique identities within the educational process. With a focus on service learning, internships, research and mentoring of Latino students at a Hispanic Serving Institution, this workshop will interactively explore the ways in which community engaged educational practices provide a powerful pathway to success for students of color, low-income and first-generation students. Results from qualitative and quantitative analyses and insights from the extant literature will be shared as the foundation for a robust discussion of what might be driving the observed success. Questions explored in this workshop will include: (1) How do community engaged learning practices provide unique opportunities for students to experience themselves as successful learners and be validated/affirmed as such? (2) What role do faculty play as validating agents in these practices? and, (3) Whom or what seems to be valued in the community engaged learning setting?

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez

Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez

Associate Professor, California State University San Marcos
Kimberly D’Anna-Hernandez, Ph.D, is an Associate Professor in Psychology. She has expertise in Mentoring Diverse Students (Entering Mentoring), Latino Communities and the role of stress and the environment on shaping Health Disparities in vulnerable underserved communities. She... Read More →
avatar for Kendra Dyanne Rivera

Kendra Dyanne Rivera

Associate Professor, California State University San Marcos
An Associate Professor of Communication at Cal State San Marcos, Dr. Rivera has engaged in extensive research with everyone from the U.S. Border Patrol to a community health clinic, in order to understand how communication can both shape and reflect overall health and wellness. A... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Villarreal

Sarah Villarreal

Associate Vice President, California State University San Marcos
Community Outreach, Economic Development, Research/Data Analysis, High Impact Practices, and Government Relations.


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ H

2:15pm

A Networked Campus Approach to Increase Student Voting
Only one in five eligible Stanford students (undergraduate, graduate, and postdocs) voted in the 2014 mid-term election. In partnership with TurboVote, in spring 2018 a campus effort was launched to inspire eligible students to register and get absentee ballots, to build a community message around the importance of voting, and to overcome obstacles to encourage our community to cast votes in the November elections. Together we created strategies engaging leadership, grassroots action, courses, and more. Come learn what made the difference and share your own ideas and lessons on increasing voting. We will share activities inspired by staff, faculty, and students toward a shared understanding of the importance of voting to the future of our democracy. Because "Democracy is NOT a Spectator Sport!"

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Kyle Williams

Brandon Kyle Williams

Cardinal Service Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, Stanford University
As the Cardinal Service Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, Brandon conducts campus-wide outreach and awareness activities, ensures a welcoming environment for students, and advises students on how to make service a distinctive feature of their Stanford experience. Brandon graduated... Read More →
avatar for Megan Swezey Fogarty

Megan Swezey Fogarty

Deputy Executive Director, Haas Center for Public Service, Stanford University
Megan's career has centered on institutional efforts to expand higher education and K-12 service engagement, including supporting the launch of AmeriCorps in California. She leads communication, outreach, and fundraising strategy for Stanford University's civic action plan called... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ G

2:15pm

Boundary Spanning Leadership: Infusing a Civic Mission in Institutions
Boundary spanning leadership is the “ability to create direction, alignment and commitment across organizational boundaries in service of a higher vision or goal (Ernst & Chrobot-Mason).” At the nexus of institutional change for civic action lies the opportunity to utilize boundary leadership to effect change. This session's goals are to identify common boundaries which exist in higher education today and then explore and test out boundary spanning practices in leveraging your leadership such as buffering, reflecting, connecting, mobilizing, weaving and transforming.

Speakers
avatar for Char Gray-Sorensen

Char Gray-Sorensen

Director, Strategic Initiatives and Operations, CC of NY & PA
My 35 yr. career spans the faith-based, nonprofit, and higher education sectors as I've focused on building healthy organizations and relationships to enable people to thrive as they grow and learn. I'm interested in building capacity through leadership development, strategic partnerships... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 2:15pm - 3:25pm
KIPJ E

3:25pm

Break
Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:25pm - 3:45pm
KIPJ Rotunda

3:45pm

Creating a Crucible Moment: Building an Integrative Civic Engagement Pathway
A Crucible Moment (2012) provides the impetus for any discussion of civic engagement in higher education; and, as its title suggests, transformative change in postsecondary education will occur by challenging conventional paradigms. By embedding innovative teaching and learning strategies that emphasize applied knowledge, students can quickly develop a civic-mindset. When higher education, suggests David Scobey, makes civic responsibility “central, not peripheral” to the educational mission, the desired outcome of participatory democracy is best attained. At no other time in American history has it been as crucial for students--no matter their academic goals--to secure civic knowledge and skills in order to compete in a global economy. CBL is promoted throughout the California State University (CSU) system but not in California’s K-12 or community college systems. CBL in K-12 is addressed sporadically; and, with regard to California’s community colleges (CCC), it is taught in a vacuum, if it is taught at all. However, the CSUs and CCCs are the two largest systems of higher education in the nation and serve the majority of the nation’s undergraduates. It is time for stakeholders to begin a dialogue of how we can create a California K-16 Civic Engagement and Community-Based Learning Pathway.

Speakers
avatar for Mariane Doyle

Mariane Doyle

Director, Career and College Readiness, William S. Hart Union High School District
avatar for Harriet Happel

Harriet Happel

Dean, Career Education and Integrated Learning, College of the Canyons
avatar for Jeanine M. Mingé

Jeanine M. Mingé

Director of Community Engagement, California State University, Northridge
PR

Patty Robinson

Faculty Director, College of the Canyons
DS

Danielle Spratt

Associate Professor and Graduate Adviser Department of English; Director of Faculty Engaged Practices and Service Learning, California State University, Northridge


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ I

3:45pm

Empowering Digital Citizens: The Role of Story and the Moral Imagination
We will share short digital narratives that inspire us to think more inclusively about our work in two educational sectors—higher education and non-profit arts education where we work on issues related to peace, human rights, social justice and environmental sustainability. Purpose: Share a peacebuilding framework, contemplative practices and storytelling exercises for being and becoming the digital citizens needed to build community and coalitions for more just, sustainable and joyful futures. Objectives: (1) introduce participants to the moral imagination as a framework that embraces multiple ways of knowing and being (2) explore digital citizenship through the lens of the moral imagination (3) build community through storytelling exercises and spirited dialogue. Impact: Shift participants’ paradigms—and practices—from digital media consumers to curators and publishers; model reflective inquiry and collaboration; provide an opportunity to contribute to a post-conference publication. Partners: We will invite workshop participants to partner with one another and with us to create a post-conference publication, building on our lived experience as digital citizens.

Speakers
MM

Martine McDonald

Journeys in Film, Journeys in Film
Director of Programs, Journeys in Film
CW

Candace Walworth

Peace Studies/Interdisciplinary Studies professor, Naropa University
Candace Walworth, Ph.D., is a Professor of Peace Studies at Naropa University where she has received numerous teaching awards, specializing in building interdisciplinary learning communities that engage the body, heart-mind, and imagination in the healing of our world. Her teaching... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ F

3:45pm

How to Become Empathy Focused and Bring Change to the World
Bringing together varying backgrounds and expertise, representatives from two of UCI’s community partners Corazon and Breakthrough San Juan Capistrano together with staff from the UCI School of Social Ecology Field Study Program, address how students benefit from learning about empathy through hands-on experiences in classrooms, volunteering, community and civic engagement or service-learning. Come together for a conversation to discuss best practices, practical application, and inspiration. Empathy is a skill that is not inherit to everyone but a soft skill everyone benefits from. We want to educate and support the growth of our students learning experiences to develop and exhibit empathy. This session will include self-reflection, discussion as a group, while being interactive and encouraging participants to have one actionable item that they can measure and take away with them.“Treat people as if they were what they ought to be and help them become what they are capable of being”—Goethe

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Cissel

Lauren Cissel

US Operations Manager, Corazón, Inc
avatar for Tamara Manson

Tamara Manson

Missions.Me
Missions.Me empowers people to change the world and has successfully hosted thousands of people on life-transforming missions experiences. Missions.Me has successfully organized large scale outreaches in numerous cities across the nations. On our trips we work towards national reconciliation... Read More →
AS

Alex Serna

Executive Director, Breakthrough San Juan Capistrano
avatar for Ashley Vikander

Ashley Vikander

Field Study Director, UC Irvine School of Social Ecology


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ 219

3:45pm

COS*Talk
Zahra Ahmed - Breathing Life into Social Justice Work. How do we transform our social justice work into life practices? How can our work be strengthened by a commitment to live and practice social justice in our daily lives while also structuring our work around this important process and goal?

Kevin Guerrieri – Unfreezing Concepts: The Work of Social Justice and the University. How do we conceptualize the intersection of social justice work, academic freedom, and the multiple purposes of the university?

Estela G. Ballón - Centering the Expertise of Students from Underserved Communities in Service-LearningThis talk will focus on how to center students from underserved communities in the development of service learning in their communities. Their knowledge and lived experiences can provide broader and multi-layered insights to the community that are incomplete or unavailable through academic and news informational sources.

Jodie Parys - Deconstructing the Global Immigration Rhetoric through Community Based Learning in the Local Community. The U.S.-Mexico border is in a state of constant flux, particularly given the current political climate and recent migrant caravans seeking asylum.  However, it is often difficult for college students to separate fact from rhetoric, particularly in this politically charged environment.  As educators, how do we in higher education guide our students in this process and help them deconstruct the rhetoric?

Marsiol Morales:  Return on Equity. How do we describe the amount of social, cultural, political, economic and environmental return an institution, community, or society generates as a result of the efforts, commitment and investment in eliminating barriers to full participation, especially for those historically and structurally marginalized from participation?

Moderators
avatar for Kathleen S. Yep

Kathleen S. Yep

Associate Dean of Faculty, Pitzer College of the Claremont Colleges
Cultural politics, feminist/antiracist pedagogies, and critical public health.

Speakers
avatar for Zahra Ahmed

Zahra Ahmed

Assistant Professor, Saint Mary's College of California
Zahra Ahmed is an Assistant Professor of Politics at St. Mary’s College of CA. Dr. Ahmed received her Masters degree in Social Work from Georgia State University and her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Irvine. She has a broad base of expertise including... Read More →
KG

Kevin Guerrieri

Associate Professor, University of San Diego
avatar for Estela Ballon

Estela Ballon

Professor, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
avatar for Jodie Parys

Jodie Parys

Professor of Spanish, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Jodie Parys is a Professor of Spanish in the Department of Languages and Literatures at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, where she teaches courses in Spanish language, translation/interpretation, professional Spanish, and Latin American literature and civilization. She is the... Read More →
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

VP of Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ Theatre

3:45pm

Fostering Reciprocity in International Service-Learning Through Human-Centered Design
As we encourage more and more students to participate in international service-learning, we must intentionally design programs in collaboration and partnership with host communities to foster deeper engagement and reciprocity between students and hosts. This session explores how incorporating a human-centered design approach can support more sustainable relationships and development.

Speakers
KE

Kira Espiritu

Director, University of San Diego
avatar for Peter Maribei

Peter Maribei

Global Center Coordinator, University of San Diego
Peter Maribei is the Global Center Coordinator for School of Leadership and Education Sciences at the University of San Diego. Peter has a PhD in leadership studies. Over the course of his career, he has developed and taught academic and co-curricular international internship and... Read More →
avatar for Ravi Raj

Ravi Raj

Co-Founder & CEO, Authentica
Ravi is the Founder & CEO of Authentica, an experiential learning company that designs and delivers inspiring short-term study-abroad programs aligned with UN Sustainable Development Goals, with a focus on Asia. Ravi works closely with community organizations to design equitable and... Read More →


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ G

3:45pm

Situating Ourselves as Feminist Activists of Color: Exploring Power and Positionality in Service-Learning Scholarship and Practice
Join us to learn how theorizing and publishing our Sustainable, Holistic, Interconnected Partnership (SHIP) Development Model emerged from being feminist activists of color. Participants will reflect critically on their own ways of knowing, feeling, being and doing and examine how their power and positionality impact their social justice scholarship/practice.

Speakers
AE

Ashley E. Cheri

Director, Early Academic Outreach Program, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Jennifer A. Yee

Jennifer A. Yee

Associate Professor, California State University, Fullerton
Professional interests: Transformative pedagogy, higher education, organizational change, service-learning, civic engagement, activism, Asian American & Pacific Islander feminisms and epistemology, and cancer survivorship.


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ 215

3:45pm

Social Justice Learning through Service: Diverse Disciplinary Perspectives
Service learning practice has been criticized for emphasizing short-term fixes, charity, and superficial approaches to complex, deeply-rooted social challenges. It is also frequently critiqued for not sufficiently addressing issues of race and class privilege in the service relationship, and for not digging deeply into the systemic nature of power, privilege and oppression. Service learning is a required component of all undergraduate majors at California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB). Building on its commitment to social justice, CSUMB has developed an approach to service learning that makes the examination of issues of systemic privilege and oppression a central component of the curriculum. In developing their service learning courses, each academic program has found ways to integrate these social justice concerns grounded in the knowledge of their discipline. This includes: 1) developing learning outcomes related to issues of identity, power and privilege; and, 2) developing assignments and classroom pedagogical strategies that help students to engage in these difficult, value-rich dialogues. In this session, faculty from diverse disciplines (Statistics, Biology and Psychology) will demonstrate how these social justice concerns are made explicit in their service learning courses. Participants will be given the opportunity to discuss these issues from their own distinctive disciplinary perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Canner

Judith Canner

Faculty, CSU Monterey Bay
Dr. Judith E. Canner received her B.S. in Mathematics from Shippensburg University, PA, in 2004 and her Ph.D. in Biomathematics and Zoology from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. She joined the Mathematics and Statistics Department at CSUMB as the first Assistant Professor... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Lovell

Jennifer Lovell

Faculty, CSU Monterey Bay
Areas of interest include psychology service learning, multicultural psychology, and clinical child psychology. We are currently integrating virtual reality assignments into our psychology service learning class and assessing impact on empathy.
avatar for Seth Pollack

Seth Pollack

Professor of Service Learning
We are forming a community in Monterey, CA. Very interested in elder-oriented cohousing.
avatar for Alana Unfried

Alana Unfried

Faculty, California State University Monterey Bay
CV

Christine Valdez

Faculty, California State University Monterey Bay


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ 217A

3:45pm

Coming Together as a Community to Nurture Students in STEAM
Preparing historically disadvantaged minority students for professions in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, enriched through the Arts (STEAM), is a community effort. Unfortunately, too many students do not believe that they are capable in STEM, or lack important resources and information about requirements and pathways leading to STEAM degrees and careers. As an Anchor Institution, USD is poised to address these issues. This presentation highlights two tandem efforts designed to invite, support, and engage the community to support this student population: 1) The STEAM Summer Academy provides quality educational programming for middle and high school students throughout San Diego’s diverse urban communities, with a focus on students from low-income areas. During the week-long experience, students are challenged to consider how developing their STEAM skills can help them address society’s most pressing issues, including poverty and unequal access to education. 2) The STEAM Youth and Community Conference is a free, one-day event that engages students and their families, the university community, STEAM professionals from minority communities, local educators, and community leaders. This workshop begins with an overview of the two programs, followed by several hands-on STEAM activities. The session ends with a conversation where participants share their questions and feedback.

Speakers
OD

Odesma Dalrymple

Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering Department, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, University of San Diego
avatar for Perla Myers

Perla Myers

Professor, University of San Diego
JS

Joi Spencer

Associate Professor, University of San Diego


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ E

3:45pm

Critically Exploring Assessment: Tensions in Developing Inclusive Assessment Practices
Assessment is seen as critical in higher ed and in community engagement/service-learning, but little research explores how to incorporate a social justice framework into assessment practices. Given the diversity of our students and their experiences, how can we honor the many ways they learn and convey knowledge? How do we incorporate community partner voice into our assessment practices? In this Community Conversation, we hope to explore the tensions we experience in assessing in an inclusive manner. Presenters will share tools and resources and guide the group discussion. The purpose of this session is to explore assessment from a critical lens and to share ideas and resources. The objectives are for participants to examine their assessment practices and work together to share resources that could guide us toward inclusive assessment. The partners represented in the session are from UC Berkeley’s Public Service Center and Stanford University’s Haas Center for Public Service. This session builds from questions generated by two of the presenters when attending a Civic Center Convening at Cornell, participating in the Group on Evaluation, Assessment & Research. We hope the impact is we develop a network of people exploring this topic and sharing resources.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Wise

Andrea Wise

Associate Director, Public Service Center, Public Service Center, UC Berkeley
JJ

Joann (Jo) Wong

Program & Organizational Effectiveness Director, Haas Center for Public Service, Stanford University


Wednesday March 6, 2019 3:45pm - 4:55pm
KIPJ 218

5:00pm

5:00pm

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from USD back to the Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel during the hours posted above.

Wednesday March 6, 2019 5:00pm - 7:15pm
University of San Diego
 
Thursday, March 7
 

7:15am

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from the Best Western Hacienda Plus Hotel to the conference site at USD during the hours posted above.

Thursday March 7, 2019 7:15am - 9:45am
Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel

7:30am

Breakfast
Thursday March 7, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
KIPJ Rotunda

7:30am

Mountain West Regional Conversation
Speakers
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

VP of Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Schooley

Stephanie Schooley

Executive Director, Campus Compact of the Mountain West
Stephanie Schooley became the Executive Director of CCMW in 2010 after serving with the organization since 2001. Over the course of Stephanie’s career with Campus Compact, she developed and implemented national service and community-engagement programming, expanded CCMW's partnerships, brought... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
KIPJ A

7:30am

Conference Registration
Thursday March 7, 2019 7:30am - 4:30pm
KIPJ Rotunda

8:30am

Conference Welcome
Speakers
avatar for Jim Harris

Jim Harris

President, University of San Diego
James T. Harris III, D.Ed., became the University of San Diego’s fourth president on August 3, 2015. The University of San Diego is one of only 44 universities in the world designated as an Ashoka U Changemaker campus. Throughout his academic career, Dr. Harris has worked closely... Read More →
avatar for Elaine Ikeda

Elaine Ikeda

Executive Director, California Campus Compact
Since 2000, Elaine Ikeda has served as the Executive Director of California CampusCompact (CACC). She has over 20 years of experience supervising volunteers in higher education, conducting research on service-learning, volunteerism and community service, and disseminating service-learning... Read More →
avatar for Persephone Lewis

Persephone Lewis

Tribal Liaison, University of San Diego


Thursday March 7, 2019 8:30am - 8:45am
KIPJ Theatre

8:45am

Keynote: Finding Common Ground: Building Community and Understanding Across Political, Demographic, and Perceptual Borders
Common Ground Voices is an international project choir initiated by the Eric Ericson International Choral Centre in 2016 based in and around Jerusalem. Common Ground Voices / La Frontera translates the mission of the original ensemble into a new geographic frame, generating meaningful collaboration through music, exploring and creating music of shared human values and aspirations, contributing to community music as an exercise of non-violence, and utilizing music as a springboard for a meaningful discussion about social and political change within the group as well as with the society in general. Facilitated by Emilie Amrein and André de Quadros, Common Ground Voices / La Frontera will bring together a diverse group of singers in a project situated at the border of Mexico and the United States in March 2019. CGV La Frontera will consider questions of identity, place, belonging, connection, and shared humanity in a region historically claimed by many.  

Speakers
avatar for Emilie Amrein

Emilie Amrein

Assistant Professor of Music, University of San Diego
Professor Amrein conducts the USD Choral Scholars and teaches courses on the intersection of music and social justice movements. She is the artistic director of Peregrine Music, an arts and education nonprofit organization committed to engaging communities in meaningful dialogue about... Read More →
avatar for André de Quadros

André de Quadros

Professor of Music and Chair, Music Education Department, Boston University
Professor de Quadros directs four choirs: the Manado State University Choir (Indonesia), Common Ground Voices (Israeli /Palestinian/international), VOICES 21C (Boston), and Muslim Choral Ensemble (Sri Lanka). In addition, he leads choral projects in Massachusetts prisons. His life... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 8:45am - 9:45am
KIPJ Theatre

9:45am

Break
Thursday March 7, 2019 9:45am - 10:00am
KIPJ Rotunda

10:00am

How the Rural American Digital Lab Dissolved Borders in Eastern Washington
During June 2018, two dozen students from Heritage University in Toppenish (WA) and Whitman College in Walla Walla (WA) participated in a unique new digital story-telling initiative called the Rural American Digital (RAD) Lab. With guidance from Seattle-based tech start-up, PopUpJustice, the student participants brought to light often-ignored or forgotten stories of the non-urban part of their state. During the four weeks of the project, members of the cohort spent time on both campuses, enjoyed broad exposure to faculty and staff from both institutions, and worked together to create digital stories about their place, culminating with a June 28 public screening and reception in Walla Walla that filled a 100-seat auditorium and garnered significant media coverage as well as opened future opportunities for the students to share their stories with high profile audiences. At the end of the month the planning team gathered extensive feedback. During our workshop, we will tell the story of this pilot program and reflect on lessons learned. We will also share future aspirations for this collaboration. Session attendees will be invited to think about whether their institutions are able to help spotlight the often overlooked stories of their communities through creative partnerships like this one.

Speakers
KB

Kimberly Bellamy-Thompson

Asst Professor, Heritage University
avatar for Lindsay Brown

Lindsay Brown

Director of Student Life, Heritage University
avatar for Noah Leavitt

Noah Leavitt

Director of the Student Engagement Center, Whitman College
liberal arts!
AM

Aurora Martin

Founder, popUPjustice
Aurora served up justice for nearly 20 years in legal aid as a public interest lawyer who grew up from intern to executive director at Columbia Legal Services. During her tenure, she led Columbia's transformation to become a creative social justice advocacy organization with a mission... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ I

10:00am

The Cajitas Project: Exploring Identity Through Material Expression
A conversation about our innovative pedagogy to encourage participants to utilize material expression in exploring questions of personal and sacred identities. We utilize contemplative practices to address issues of micro and macro disjunctures and fissures in the lives of students, faculty and community workers.

Speakers
LK

Louis Komjathy

Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of San Diego
AL

Alberto López Pulido

Professor, University of San Diego


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ H

10:00am

Epistemic Justice and the Power of Stories in Transforming Community Engagement
A learning community of diverse community engagement stakeholders will explore Dr. Miranda Fricker’s (2007) philosophical framework of epistemic justice/injustice through the lens of lived experience and contemporary scholarship, and discuss implications for transforming community-engaged work. This session builds on conversations from a preconference at the July 2018 IARSLCE Conference, and integrates a dynamic body of resources and discourses curated by facilitators for participants to apply in their professional contexts. The purpose is to integrate epistemic justice as a framework for the community engagement field to achieve just, inclusive, equitable social transformation Primary outcomes are: Build knowledge of epistemic justice/injustice as a philosophical framework Analyze how epistemic injustice shapes community engagement Develop action plan for disrupting epistemic injustice Participants will learn about the defining elements of epistemic justice/injustice, discover the potential epistemic and ethical repercussions of injustice for individuals and community through participation in a story circle, and discuss how to promote epistemic justice in community engagement endeavors in areas of examination that emerge from common themes in our shared stories. We aim to foster ongoing dialogue that will produce insights, interventions, and strategies for participants to use in their respective contexts to promote a culture and practice of epistemic justice.  

Materials and slides: https://epistemicjusticeiarslce2018.wordpress.com/

Speakers
AB

Adam Bush

Founding Provost, College Unbound
Adam Bush is the founding Provost of College Unbound; a degree completion college working with both inside and outside carceral spaces of Rhode Island to ensure all adult learners have access to a Bachelor's degree pathway that values them as scholar-practitioners and is embedded... Read More →
avatar for Star Plaxton-Moore

Star Plaxton-Moore

Director of Community-Engaged Learning, University of San Francisco
Star specializes in working with faculty to integrate community-engaged pedagogy into their courses, and plays a critical role in shaping institutional discourse, practices, and policies related to community-engaged program design and assessment, community partnerships, and faculty... Read More →
avatar for Chris Nayve

Chris Nayve

Associate Vice President Community Engagement, University of San Diego
avatar for John Saltmarsh

John Saltmarsh

Professor of Higher Education, Department of Leadership in Education, College of Education and Human Development, University of Massachusetts, Boston
avatar for John Loggins

John Loggins

Director of Community Engaged Learning, University of San Diego
John Loggins the Director of Community Engaged Learning in the Karen and Tom Mulvaney Center for Community, Awareness and Social Action at the University of San Diego. John works collaboratively as part of a team responsible for ensuring that USD is a global and national leader as... Read More →
LC

Linda Caballero Sotelo

Executive Director, New Americans Museum
avatar for James Lin

James Lin

Senior Director of Mission and Spirituality, GLIDE Foundation/Glide Memorial Church
I'm a native Californian who lived half of my life in other places. Some of the things I've been involved with: directing the Multicultural Resource Center at Reed College, helping found the Chinese UNTraining (a group working on internalized oppression in progressive Chinese communities... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ B

10:00am

Shaping the Future through Legacy: Art as a Tool for Reconnecting History, Healing, and Social change
This session exists in 4 stages: Creating Context, Self-Exploration, Self-Development through Art, and Connecting the Content. You enter the workshop’s circle with facilitators - Cam Perdido and Mable Sanders - and participants. The walls are an art gallery, highlighting historical moments. Then, facilitators contextualize their Filipino-American roots in higher education spaces. They discuss tracing the process of colonization, learning at one’s own pace but not at others’ expense, and how to acknowledge ancestral roots. Through exploring the art gallery, you unpack how different junctures in life have been affected by history. You link your roots and experiences to others. The purpose: to build authentic connections between participants and initiate curiosity for one’s own history. After, facilitators share personal art mediums to jumpstart the self-development practice. You create an art piece to process your stake in social change. Finally, facilitators connect self-healing, ancestral roots, and taking up space in civic work. Now, you carry skills for self-development and your art piece in your invisible backpack of privilege, power, and positionality. For YOU, this workshop inspired intentional self-development, rebuilding intergenerational relationships, connecting across difference, and entering a civic space with the knowledge of how legacy will change the trajectory of the future.

Speakers
CP

Cam Perdido

Student, INVST Community Leadership Program Class 2019
MS

Mable Sanders

Student, INVST Community Leadership Program Class 2020


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ E

10:00am

The Napier Initiative: Intergenerational Community Partnerships to Encourage Creative Leadership for Social Change
This presentation will share the story of the Napier Initiative, launched in 2010 to build intergenerational bridges between the residents of Pilgrim Place, a local retirement community, and The Claremont Colleges. Pilgrim Place is home to 330 residents, many of whom spent their careers in the United States and abroad as advocates for social change. As elders who continue to probe, connect and grow, they constitute a rich resource for helping talented undergraduates make enduring commitments to leadership for social change. Participants in this session will hear about the growth of the Napier Initiative from a post-graduate fellowship and mentorship program to the current format that also includes intergenerational courses taught throughout The Claremont Colleges. Each Napier course engages students and elder co-learners on issues related to peace, social justice, and/or environmental sustainability. The Napier courses include a community or civic engagement component, and also explicit discussions among instructors, undergraduates and elders regarding vocational commitment and leadership. The lessons learned from a five-year evaluation of the Napier Initiative will be shared and should be useful for spurring discussion about the challenges and opportunities of intentionally connecting community elders and college undergraduates in the collaborative pursuit of learning and social justice.

Speakers
avatar for Gabriela Gamiz

Gabriela Gamiz

Director, Community Engagement, Harvey Mudd College
KH

Karl Haushalter

Associate Profess of Chemistry and Biology, Harvey Mudd College


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ F

10:00am

Building Competency & Exploring Diverse Pathways to Community Engaged Careers
In order to address complex issues and move toward a more inclusive, diverse, and equitable future, we need skilled and well-prepared civic engagement leaders and professionals. Have you ever wondered "How did that person get that position? What do I need to do to get that kind of job?" Our session will focus on conversation with a panel of community engagement professionals at different places in their careers, gleaning their thoughts on how to build a career in the higher education civic and community engagement field. In talking about our their career paths, presenters will discuss the competencies they developed in particular areas that are being covered by Campus Compact's new credential program for community engagement professionals. Each presenter will offer practical advice and share experiences, and time will be available for session attendees to ask tons of questions of the presenters. Come find out how to build your career and competency as a community and civic engagement professional.

Additional Information:
In choosing panelists for this session, we were intentional about bringing together practitioners from diverse backgrounds, each entering the field of “community engagement” from a unique trajectory. Each presenter will reflect on how their own positionality (as it relates to race, culture, class, gender, sexuality, professional status, etc.) has afforded them both opportunities and challenges as higher education community engagement professionals, and how they have negotiated questions of power, privilege, and difference in their collaborative work with partners both on and off campus. We will also ask them to explore the critical and ethical commitments that inspire them and whether (or to what extent) they have been able to root these commitments in their professional work and the activities they facilitate. Through these presentations and the Q&A that follows, we hope to be able to highlight that getting a job in the field does not require that one fit a particular mold, but rather that many ways of being and knowing bring individuals into the field and allow them to be effective in their roles advancing campus/community partnerships and democratic engagement. In fact, we will suggest that it is the diversity of experience and knowledges that make the entire field stronger.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Browning

Heather Browning

Program Director, Emerson Fellowship: Transforming Dialogue into Action, Stanford University
Heather O. Browning is an educator and thought leader with over 10 years of experience in roles related to institutional diversity and inclusion within higher education. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies from California State University, Long Beach, and Master... Read More →
avatar for Clayton Hurd

Clayton Hurd

Director, Professional Learning, Campus Compact
I'm a cultural anthropologist and public scholar with over 20 years experience developing and facilitating community-engaged learning and research programs at a range of higher education institutions. My areas of practice include faculty development, institutionalization of community... Read More →
PP

Pilar Pacheco

Center Director, CSU Channel Islands
AT

Andrea Tully

Community Engagement & Project Coordinator, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ C

10:00am

Finding Common Ground: Building Community and Understanding Across Political, Demographic, and Perceptual Borders
Comprised of singers from Mexico, the US, and around the world, Common Ground Voices “aims to generate a meaningful collaboration through music; to explore and create music of shared human values and aspirations; to contribute to community music as an exercise of non-violence; and to utilize music as a springboard for a meaningful discussion about social and political change, within the group as well as with the society in general.” In this workshop, participants will encounter a variety of multi-dimensional listening practices embedded into the very fabric of the ensemble’s work, including core activities meant to build empathy and invoke a vision of a yet-to-be world. These activities include a variety of active listening exercises, Theater of the Oppressed games, healing circles, and reflective dialogue. Perhaps most significantly, these activities invite participants to become present to themselves, each other, and the world. This presence could be seen as a spiritual practice of connecting, a making space for genuine relationships to be made.


Speakers
avatar for Emilie Amrein

Emilie Amrein

Assistant Professor of Music, University of San Diego
Professor Amrein conducts the USD Choral Scholars and teaches courses on the intersection of music and social justice movements. She is the artistic director of Peregrine Music, an arts and education nonprofit organization committed to engaging communities in meaningful dialogue about... Read More →
avatar for André de Quadros

André de Quadros

Professor of Music and Chair, Music Education Department, Boston University
Professor de Quadros directs four choirs: the Manado State University Choir (Indonesia), Common Ground Voices (Israeli /Palestinian/international), VOICES 21C (Boston), and Muslim Choral Ensemble (Sri Lanka). In addition, he leads choral projects in Massachusetts prisons. His life... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ Theatre

10:00am

Her Place in the World: Educational Opportunity for Incarcerated Young People
Prison dehumanizes, not as a side effect but as a central function. A child who is forcibly removed from home and society and placed inside a cage receives a powerful message about herself and her place in the world.
(Nell Bernstein, Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison, p.33)

On any given day in this country, 60,000 people under the age of 18 are incarcerated in detention, jails and prisons. By locking kids away, we are taking away their identity, their freedom, and minimizing their existence.  What could it look like if we did things differently? What if we could send a different and more hopeful message to young people who are locked up? What, if anything, is the role of colleges and universities, especially public institutions, to those in local juvenile detention centers, jails and prisons? In keeping with the conference theme, this session will examine how we can reach beyond barriers, and in this case, physical barriers of steel doors and razor wire, to think more inclusively about our work.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Smith Arthur

Deborah Smith Arthur

2019 Engaged Scholar Award Recipient, Portland State University
Deborah Smith Arthur, JD., is a vigorous and steadfast advocate for youth justice and for promoting educational access for people who are incarcerated and formerly incarcerated. Her teaching at Portland State University over the past 15 years has revolved around community based learning... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ G

10:00am

Using the SLQAT, A Research-Based Tool for Supporting and Determining the Quality of Service-Learning Courses
Through guided use of the tool, this interactive workshop will introduce attendees to the rationale, development, and potential uses of the Service-Learning Quality Assessment Tool (SLQAT), developed by researchers from the University of Georgia and the University of Minnesota. Research has identified many best practices for developing and teaching service-learning courses. However, our field has lacked a consistent, standardized tool for assessing whether a given course incorporates the essential elements; the SLQAT was developed in response to this need. The SLQAT has 28 "Essential Elements" which are important for quality student learning outcomes in academic service-learning courses from any discipline, and can be used for research purposes as well as for faculty development and course construction. After an overview of the process, decisions, and development of the SLQAT, the session engages participants in reviewing and using the tool, and in how to reliability rate key elements. Workshop participants will use the SLQAT with a sample course, and will be invited to provide feedback on the protocols, instrument, and potential uses on their campus, including participation in the next stage of piloting.

Speakers
AF

Andrew Furco

Associate Vice President/Professor, University of Minnesota
1. Senior leadership and administrative issues regarding the advancement of community and civic engagement in higher education. 2. The latest research findings on the impacts of community engagement on students, faculty, institutions, and communities.
avatar for Laurel Hirt

Laurel Hirt

Director, Center for Community-Engaged Learning, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
avatar for Isabel Lopez

Isabel Lopez

na, University of Minnesota
I'm a doctoral candidate in the Educational Psychology program at the University of Minnesota. My areas of study include community-engagement, and achievement motivation in higher education.
avatar for Paul Matthews

Paul Matthews

Associate Director, Office of Service-Learning, University of Georgia


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ A

10:00am

Thematic Poster Session #1
Poster: Service-Learning as Capacity Building: An Evaluation of Applied Projects Effect on Program Sustainability. This poster examines the effect of student service-learning, via applied projects, on community-based agencies within San Diego County, California. This research has numerous practical applications for assessing an institution of higher education’s impact on local community-based organizations

Poster: Digging Deep: Bringing Meaning to One-Day Service Events. Student leaders will demonstrate how they turn a one-day service event into a meaningful service experience for the volunteers, and the community benefit organizations we partner with. Presenters will dig deeper on into the impact of long-term partnerships and how meaningful service experiences can mobilize action.  

Poster: Cultivating a Culture of Engagement on Campus: Democracy & Civic Action Week at University of Alaska Anchorage. This poster will explore the impetus, creation, and implementation of week-long series of events bringing together university departments, centers, students, and community organizations.

Poster: Pursuing the "Story Behind the Story" through Newspaper Theater. Newspaper Theater is a method of critically engaging with media coverage of contemporary issues by transforming non-dramatic texts into performance. 

Moderators
avatar for Sandra Bass

Sandra Bass

Associate Dean of Students and Director, UC Berkeley
For over 20 years, Sandra Bass has been a champion for social justice. With professional and personal experiences cutting across issue areas and geographies, her passion is educating and activating our next generation of social change agents. Sandra holds a bachelor’s degree in... Read More →

Speakers
DM

Donna M. Aguiniga

Associate Professor, School of Social Work; Associate Director, Center for Community Engagement and Learning, University of Alaska Anchorage
TB

Taylan Bennett-Parker

Special Projects Coordinator, California State University, Fresno
avatar for Leslie Garvin

Leslie Garvin

Executive Director, North Carolina Campus Compact
avatar for Marsha A. Olson

Marsha A. Olson

CCEL Faculty Fellow / Communication Faculty, University of Alaska Anchorage
Be Counted UAA: A Community-Engaged Approach to Young Voter Education
avatar for Colton C. Strawser

Colton C. Strawser

Research Fellow, Mulvaney Center, University of San Diego


Thursday March 7, 2019 10:00am - 11:10am
KIPJ D

11:10am

Break
Thursday March 7, 2019 11:10am - 11:30am
KIPJ Rotunda

11:30am

An Inclusive Conversation for Initiating a Regional Faculty Professional Development Institute: Beyond our Community and Building Bridges
Offering quality faculty development programming is essential in order to facilitate more equity and social justice in our curriculum and advance positive change in our minds, hearts, and actions both on and off campus. Colleges and universities may provide some opportunities but many do not have the resources to have consistent programming. To address these gaps, some regions offer community engagement institutes which provide a well-rounded curriculum. However, there is a lack of such opportunities in the southwest and western region of the country. These regions have unique characteristics such as international borders and indigenous populations that require distinct curriculum that may not be offered in other regions. Furthermore, programming representing the needs of our vast community college systems is often overlooked. In order to offer an inclusive institute, an examination of what type of curriculum best represents the needs of these regions is imperative. The proposed interactive conversation will be facilitated by a diversity of individuals from across the region and a variety of institutions. During this session, key questions such as what should such an institute look like, what would make us unique, and how do we address the needs across a variety of institutions will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Anover

Veronica Anover

Faculty Director, Cal State San Marcos University
I love teaching and learning, helping and understanding others. I love solving problems and finding solutions. As Interim Faculty Director of Service Learning I organize and lead workshops on how to teach Service Learning and what are best practices, among other things! I am also... Read More →
CC

Christine Cress

Professor, PACE Program, Graduate School of Education, Portland State University
DD

David Donahue

Director, Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, University of San Francisco
PR

Patty Robinson

Faculty Director, College of the Canyons
SS

Sandra Sgoutas-Emch

Director, University of San Diego


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ A

11:30am

Cultivating Mindfulness: Engaging in Present Moment Awareness to Move Beyond Borders and Boundaries
Within the contexts of our universities and workplace settings, it is critical to implement ways of infusing diversity, equity, inclusion and justice as we interact with our colleagues in order to build more collegial and supportive communities. Ideally this can increase effectiveness, communication, and overall success. However, in reality it is often challenging and difficult to carry out. Conflict may arise due to differences in our diverse backgrounds, ethical/moral principles, cultural values, political affiliation, etc. Differences often get unintentionally exasperated, thus creating borders and boundaries that divide us. Minor disagreements between individuals and couples can escalate into physical altercations, verbal aggression, and psychological abuse. Tension and conflict between groups can lead to marginalization, oppression, and injustice. In this workshop participants will be faced with a challenging task. We will take time to reflect on feelings and emotions experienced during the exercise. After introducing participants to a brief history and background of mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques, we will lead the group in practicing several mindfulness techniques. We will then observe the impact of mindfulness in fostering shared understanding, perspective taking, and communication to move beyond the illusion of the borders and boundaries we create for ourselves.

Speakers
KL

Kasey Lennon

Psychology Alumni, CSU Channel Islands
CT

Christy Teranishi Martinez

Professor of Psychology, CSU Channel Islands


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ G

11:30am

Race and Community Engagement: Building Our Capacity to Listen, Reflect, Discuss and Act
Through this session we hope to further the conversation about race in the field of community engagement and allow for two separate and simultaneous spaces where colleagues can reflect on how race impacts them personally, interpersonally and institutionally. One space will be for white identified participants, facilitated by white facilitators (Koth and Cotterman). One space will be for POC, facilitated by POC (Nondabula and Loggins). Ideally, the spaces will run concurrently and be near each other at the conference site. The goal of the white identified group is to engage with white identified colleagues in a process around understanding how race and racism impacts them, and their work in the field of community engagement. We will explore how frequently white dominant culture negatively impacts our work and our ability to be positive agents of change. The goal of the POC group is to engage with POC colleagues to uplift ways of knowing and being that are largely overlooked and unappreciated in the field of community engagement. Through storytelling, reflecting, and learning we will challenge and better equip ourselves to use community engagement as a tool to combat racism and lift up visions and practices that foster racial equity.

Speakers
avatar for Karin Cotterman

Karin Cotterman

Director of Engage San Francisco, University of San Francisco
Karin Cotterman directs Engage San Francisco, an intentional, systematic and transformative university-community initiative focused on achieving community-identified outcomes supporting children, youth and families in the Western Addition through student learning, research and teaching... Read More →
avatar for Kent Koth

Kent Koth

Executive Director, Seattle University Center for Community Engagement
Kent Koth is the founding director of the Seattle University Center for Community Engagement. Through this role Kent leads the Seattle University Youth Initiative, a long-term commitment by Seattle University faculty, staff and students from all disciplines to join with parents, the... Read More →
avatar for John Loggins

John Loggins

Director of Community Engaged Learning, University of San Diego
John Loggins the Director of Community Engaged Learning in the Karen and Tom Mulvaney Center for Community, Awareness and Social Action at the University of San Diego. John works collaboratively as part of a team responsible for ensuring that USD is a global and national leader as... Read More →
avatar for Nolizwe Nondabula

Nolizwe Nondabula

Associate Director, Engage San Francisco, University of San Francisco
Nolizwe (they/them) joined the McCarthy Center team in 2016 and currently serves as the Associate Director of Programs and Partnerships for Engage San Francisco. They additionally sit on the steering committee of the Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project (BLMP), a project fiscally sponsored... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ H

11:30am

Grounding Ourselves in Community: A Critical Practitioners Guide to Not Knowing (Everything)
Recognizing complexity, contradictions, doubt in our own practice as service-learning faculty and program administrators, we seek ways to ground ourselves, students, and faculty equitably in the local community. For faculty, the paradigm shift from disciplinary expert to co-learner with students requires a surrender of the traditional academic “knowing”. Opening ourselves to learning and honoring community-based histories, contexts, strengths, and issues often runs counter to academic hierarchies and their role in perpetuating the status quo. Session participants will explore the presenters’ proposition that a critical approach to service-learning includes creating more space for faculty and students to critically reflect on our own identities, ideals, and implicit biases and cultivating dispositions that build capacity to authentically value and honor community voice, experience, and knowledge. We will share a series of frameworks from across and beyond the community engagement field that we integrate into faculty development and classes and an illustrative case study of faculty transformation. Participants will brainstorm how they might apply these frameworks in their own contexts: Positionality (Takacs, 2003), Cultural Humility (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998), Threads of Learning (Berling 2004), Critical Consciousness (Freire, 1970) , Accompaniment (Farmer, 2011), Othering/Belonging (powell, 2012), Asset Based Community Development (McKnight & Kretzmann, 1996).

Speakers
avatar for Julia van der Ryn

Julia van der Ryn

Executive Director, Center for University Partnerships and Community Engagement/Assist. Prof. Philosophy, Dominican University of California
avatar for Lynn Sondag

Lynn Sondag

Associate Professor, Department of Art, Art History, Design, Dominican University of California
avatar for Emily S. Wu

Emily S. Wu

Assistant Director of Community Outreach and Project Development, Service-Learning Program; Religion Faculty, Dominican University of California
Emily S. Wu is a transnational foodie, an avid traveler, and a scholar of Asian religions in the globalized world. She is always interested in crossing boundaries and exploring diverse perspectives.


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ B

11:30am

School of Rock the Vote: Forging a Vision, Action, and Partnerships to Advance Student Voting and Activism
This interactive session will draw on the knowledge and experience of attendees, featured staff, student leaders and community partners connected to the USF McCarthy Center. Participants will discuss strategies for implementing programs to increase students’ participation in activities like voting and grassroots organizing. We will explore questions such as: What is your vision for student engagement in justice work on/off campus? How do you create space for student activism and launch formal programs? Who are your allies and partners and how will you overcome institutional resistance? What are some challenges and opportunities you face in achieving goals? To transition the discussion from vision to action, we will highlight two programs and share the mechanics of launching them, including challenges and opportunities inherent to the process. The case studies will include USF Votes, a voter engagement initiative, and the Community Empowerment Activist program, which connects students with grassroots advocacy organizations. This dialogical workshop is designed to be participatory--part story session, part power mapping. Attendees will acquire concrete examples on how to forge partnerships and build capacity to develop similar programs to strengthen our collective work to foster leadership and engagement for a more just, equitable, and sustainable future.

Moderators
avatar for Liana Molina

Liana Molina

Program Manager, University of San Francisco
Liana Molina is the program manager for the Community Empowerment Activist program at the Leo T. McCarthy Center. The CEA program develops critically engaged students through a part-time paid internship placement with community-based organizations throughout San Francisco. She previously... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alaina Arroyo

Alaina Arroyo

Community Empowerment Activist, University of San Francisco
My name is Alaina Aflague Arroyo and I am a fourth year undergraduate student at the University of San Francisco, studying Critical Diversity Studies and Sociology. I am of Native Chamoru, Mexican, and Puerto Rican ancestry. A lot of my interests surround the rights of Native Pacific... Read More →
AD

Abree Dominguez

B.A. Media Studies, former USFVotes Team Leader, Andrew Goodman Foundation Ambassador, University of San Francisco
AT

Araceli Tamayo-Lee

Field Organizer, San Francisco Rising
avatar for Angeline Vuong

Angeline Vuong

Assistant Director, Public Service Programs, University of San Francisco


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ F

11:30am

So, What Happens After You Are "Woke?" Service Learning Student Leaders Speak
Critical service learning, through reflection on issues of power, privilege, and oppression, can result in students becoming ‘woke’ to issues of injustice, whether it is police brutality, health disparities, the school to prison pipeline, or inequity in education. At CSUMB, Service Learning Student Leaders guide service learners in the process of becoming caring, respectful community members. However, our ultimate goal is for students to go beyond a service perspective to a social justice perspective, that is, to become “woke” to systemic inequalities and to take action. After an introduction to the CSUMB Service Learning Leadership Program, the student leaders will share stories about how their identities play a role in their work as mentors and role models. From their marginalized and privileged standpoints, the leaders will show how they navigate the challenges of becoming social justice change-makers. The session will end with interactive small group discussions and story telling about staying woke and taking action. The audience will come away with ideas for how to encourage critical service learning practices so that students who become aware of social injustice feel empowered to take action about the injustices they witness.

Speakers
JB

Jessyca Boone

Student, California State University Monterey Bay
PM

Pamela Motoike

Faculty, California State University Monterey Bay
SR

Sebastian Roti

Service Learning Student Leader, California State University Monterey Bay
VV

Victoria Vasquez-Alvarez

Student, California State University Monterey Bay


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ C

11:30am

What Do We Mean by “Civic Engagement”? Conceptualizing a Critical Approach to Democratic Practice
Presently, there are many calls for higher education to once again be the incubator of democratic practice, particularly given widespread concern about the continuing disengagement of young people from electoral politics. Due to the divisive nature of our national conversations surrounding public policy, those on campus have regularly turned to community service as both a cure for democratic malaise, as well as a means to build bridges for greater social unity. However, given the entrenched nature of inequality within our societal structures, any emerging agenda around the growth of democratic practice cannot exist at the expense of working toward greater social justice. This session will engage attendees in a conversation about how we conceptualize what it means to be civically engaged. The facilitator will draw upon his experience teaching a course on critical civic engagement, which includes an examination of the systemic causes of inequality, as well as what informs our perspectives of how to address it. Colleagues will discuss the need for identity exploration within civic work, how we engage with community organizations who may be unintentionally perpetuating the status quo, and how we develop our students’ critical consciousness as a function of democratic practice.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Barrera

Douglas Barrera

Associate Director, UCLA Center for Community Learning
Doug Barrera directs the Civic Engagement minor and the Astin Civic Engagement Research program, teaches classes in the Civic Engagement subject area, manages AmeriCorps programs, and conducts research and assessment for the UCLA Center for Community Learning. Doug is currently exploring... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ 220

11:30am

Engaged Graduate Education in the Research University
This session will describe findings from an interdisciplinary learning community that convened in the Spring of 2018 to explore graduate-level service-learning and community engagement (SLCE) at a large research university. Members of the “Engaged Graduate Education” Learning Community (“EGE”), comprised of thirteen graduate students and three service-learning program administrators (“members”), met monthly and completed independent research projects on the state of SLCE in their departments and/or fields. Throughout the semester-long EGE, we utilized a mixed-methods “values-engaged assessment” framework (Bandy et. al., 2016) to analyze discussion notes, member assignments, and final projects, and to identify the dominant norms and values that might encourage or deter graduate students from participating in SLCE. Though values vary in important ways by degree program, we found that, for the most part, these norms limit graduate SLCE in pervasive and substantive ways. In this session, we will discuss our findings and propose both strategic and tactical (Hubrig, McWain, Meade & Shah, 2017) approaches for supporting graduate SLCE in research universities similar to our own with the goal of shifting dominant perceptions of graduate education and creating large-scale change. Such strategies for change include identifying allies, building communication channels, and making use of existing institutional structures.

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Bernstein-Sierra

Samantha Bernstein-Sierra

Assist. Dir. of Research and Academic Affairs, USC Joint Educational Project
avatar for Susan C. Harris

Susan C. Harris

Executive Director, USC Joint Educational Project


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ E

11:30am

Thematic Poster Session #2
Poster 1: Empathy through Experiential Connections with Nature. Our perceptions and experiences within nature are a part of our evolutionary context, as is our connection with natural areas. At UCI, Independent Studies and the Social Ecology Field Study Program allow opportunities for empathy-fostering experiential activities at the UC Natural Reserve System San Joaquin Marsh Reserve and UCI Arboretum and Herbarium.  

Poster 2: “That’s Is Not A Thing Here” Food Insecurity at Private and Selective Institutions. College student food insecurity has increasingly become a concern. Private and selective institutions are often looked as places where students do not experience food insecurity because of assumptions about the affluence of students that attend. Please join to learn about how a small college is addressing food insecurity.

Poster 3: University of the Parks: Community-Engaged Education to Build Capacity and Resources Around Public Lands. Public lands in the United States encompass conflict across political, social, economic, and cultural borders, especially in western states. University of the Parks is an initiative to build partnerships and relationships in a regional nexus of public lands and rural communities.  

Poster 4: ‘Having Enough’: Students’ Understanding of Food Insecurity and Campus Food Pantry Use and Possible Solutions. A qualitative narrative inquiry using in-depth semi-structured interviews, journaling, and photoelicitation explored experiences of three students using a campus food pantry 

Moderators
MS

Marie Sandy

Associate Professor, University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Community partner perspectives of service-learning and public engaged scholarship; online service-learning; qualitative research design for community-based research.

Speakers
PA

Peter A. Bowler

Teaching Professor, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Jamie Daugherty

Jamie Daugherty

Assistant Professor/Dietitian, Fontbonne University
Jamie has been a dietitian for 14 years and brings many ingredients to the table.  She received her BA in Psychology from St. Louis University and a BS in Nutrition and Dietetics from University of Illinois – Chicago.  Upon completion of all Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics requirements... Read More →
avatar for Jacqualine Grant

Jacqualine Grant

Associate Professor, Southern Utah University
People should talk to me about biocultural diversity, distributed food networks, and how to use next generation sequencing to engage STEM students with the community.
avatar for Danny Ledezma

Danny Ledezma

Associate Director of Community Engagement, Harvey Mudd College


Thursday March 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:40pm
KIPJ D

1:00pm

Lunch & Acknowledgements
Speakers
avatar for Carrie Bergman

Carrie Bergman

Associate Director, The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society
Carrie Bergman joined CMind in 2000 and, over the past 19 years, has helped to coordinate events, projects, and initiatives across all of the Center’s program areas. She now serves as Associate Director, supporting CMind’s programs, operations, website, and communications, including... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Vernon

Andrea Vernon

Executive Director, Montana Campus Compact
Andrea Vernon has worked in higher education service learning, nonprofit administration, and AmeriCorps National Service programs for the past twenty-three years in Montana. Through this work, Andrea is involved in administering programs that engage college students in community-based... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 1:00pm - 1:10pm
Hahn University Center, Forum Ballroom

1:10pm

The Inner Work of Engagement for Justice: Embodied Mindfulness for Well-being and for Being Well With Others
Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Magee

Rhonda Magee

Professor of Law, University of San Francisco
Rhonda V. Magee (M.A., J.D.) is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco, and is an internationally-recognized thought and practice leader on integrating Mindfulness into Higher Education, Law, and Social Justice.  Professor Magee is a Fellow of the Mind and Life Institute... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Hahn University Center, Forum Ballroom

2:00pm

Break
Thursday March 7, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
KIPJ Rotunda

2:30pm

How to Build Safe Colleges and Universities for Our Undocumented Communities
The purpose of this session is to provide participants with the knowledge necessary to create resources to support undocumented students on their campuses. Based off a model implemented by the Los Rios College Federation of Teachers in the Los Rios Community College District in Sacramento, California --we highlight how an UndocuAlly program can not only create a safer campus by improving awareness and shifting pedagogical approaches on campus, but can also serve as an important resource for developing and sustaining community partnerships with local schools, school districts, and non-profits. Learning Objectives include: 1) To provide an overview of a research driven UndocuAlly training 2) To develop an understanding of the mental health and well being as it relates to undocumented communities' experiences. 3) To create action plans for creating programs and trainings to support undocumented students and their families on participants' campuses. 4) To highlight potential areas for mutually beneficial institutional partnerships.

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Guzmán

Sandra Guzmán

Counselor, Sacramento City College
avatar for Belinda Lum

Belinda Lum

Professor of Sociology, Sacramento City College
Dr. Lum is an Assistant Professor of Sociology in the Division of Social Sciences at Sacramento City College and a current executive board member of the Los Rios College Federation of Teachers. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Southern California. Her dissertation... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ 220

2:30pm

Challenging and Supporting Faculty New to Equity-Based Community-Based Learning: Bridging Across Difference
What are your institution’s standards for community-based learning courses? Is a social justice lens a mandatory component? Some faculty find difficulty in framing projects outside of the charity model, leading deep reflection, and facilitating difficult conversations. Others teach subjects in fields that have not historically tied into civic and community engagement. Are we excluding faculty from incorporating CBL by setting seemingly unreachable standards for reflection, discussion, and a racial equity framework? This interactive workshop aims for participants to critically reflect on CBL at their institution. By the end of the discussion, participants should be able to 1) Identify common concerns keeping faculty from incorporating community-based learning in their classes and 2) Share strategies to support faculty new to community-based learning. In addition to facilitating the discussion, presenters will share what prompted the discussion and provide an overview of their approach to a Community-Based Learning Professional Development Continuum.

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Cherry

Hannah Cherry

Program Coordinator, Portland Community College - Community Based Learning Program
Hannah Cherry is a Student Affairs Professional who specializes in community-based learning. As Portland Community College CBL Program Coordinator, her work is centered around social responsibility, equity, inclusion, and collaboration. Prior to PCC, she served for several years as... Read More →
avatar for Lisa George

Lisa George

Community Based Learning Faculty Coordinator, Portland Community College - Community Based Learning Program
Lisa George is a social justice educator specializing in faculty development. As CBL Faculty Coordinator and TLC Coordinator, Lisa provides leadership to PCC with a focus on equity, diversity, and inclusive classroom and campus practices. A part-time sociology instructor at PCC since... Read More →
CT

Catherine Thomas

CBL Faculty Coordinator, Part-Time Faculty ESOL, Portland Community College - Community Based Learning Program
Catherine Thomas is the CBL Faculty Coordinator for Southeast Campus at PCC. She holds a Master of Arts, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (T.E.S.O.L), and a BA in Applied Linguistics from Portland State University. Catherine has 20 years of experience as an ESOL Instructor... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ I

2:30pm

Followup to Keynote Session: Exploring the Inner Work of Engagement for Good
Description to be followed

Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Magee

Rhonda Magee

Professor of Law, University of San Francisco
Rhonda V. Magee (M.A., J.D.) is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco, and is an internationally-recognized thought and practice leader on integrating Mindfulness into Higher Education, Law, and Social Justice.  Professor Magee is a Fellow of the Mind and Life Institute... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ A

2:30pm

Mediating Inequities in Community-Based Learning Through Contemplative Practices
Mindfulness practices can expand how academic knowledge is constructed and valued. Influenced by an Ethnic Studies/Gender Studies/ Queer Studies framing of community engagement, this session explores community-based learning as multi-layered contested terrain rather than a neutral intellectual project. We will discuss the impact of using contemplative practices as a means to foster an asset-based, intersectional, and social ecological approach to community-based learning. Representing different types of institutions (e.g. community college, private university, public university, and liberal arts), presenters will discuss contemplative methodology, reflect on its impact and will facilitate some of the methodology. We will offer mindfulness tools that can be used by faculty, students, and community partners to build capacity and resources. This includes collective grounding, relational mindfulness and embodied dialogical pedagogies.

Speakers
CG

Christine Gottlieb

Assistant Professor, California State University, East Bay
Christine Gottlieb is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at California State University, East Bay. She specializes in Shakespeare, gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, disability studies, health humanities, and community-based learning. She completed her Ph.D... Read More →
HK

Henny Kim-Ortel

Professor of English, Ventura College
AM

Ali Mossaver-Rahmani

Faculty, University of La Verne
avatar for Kathleen S. Yep

Kathleen S. Yep

Associate Dean of Faculty, Pitzer College of the Claremont Colleges
Cultural politics, feminist/antiracist pedagogies, and critical public health.


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ G

2:30pm

The 4 Tezcatlipocas: Transformation Through Critical and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy
This session will provide a brief overview of a critical & culturally relevant service learning approach that incorporates a Chicano Indigenous framework called the Four Tezcatlipocas. Participants in the session will learn about the elements of this approach, its connection to other research, the implementation process, and potential outcomes and implications. This work, rooted in inquiry, critical theory, and social and environmental justice, is significant to the field of service education because of its transformative capacity for personal/academic growth, as well as individual and collective agency. The Four Tezcatlipocas was first utilized within the context of education by the Mexican American Studies educators (Gonzalez & Enrique Acosta, 2006) in Tucson Unified School District. Within my own high school classroom, I incorporated the Four Tezcatlipocas into a form of student praxis with the decolonial intentions of self-direction and community-healing. This approach consists of four main steps that students follow: critical self-reflection (Tezcatlipoca), gaining perspective and precious knowledge (Quetzalcoatl), the will to act(Huitzilopochtli), and renewal and transformation (Xipe Totec). It is my hopes(but not necessary) to bring three high school students to participate in this session in order to provide personal testimony and stories about their experiences with the Four Tezcatlipocas.

Speakers
avatar for Ricardo Medina

Ricardo Medina

Professor of Practice, University of San Diego


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ F

2:30pm

Decolonizing Service Learning and Emancipatory SLCE Assessment: Narratives from the Field
Purpose: This session examines the work of radical community engagement professionals seeking to grapple with the hegemonic nature of the service learning/community engagement (SLCE) field across multiple contexts using decolonizing theories and methodologies.
Objectives: As critical scholars and activists have provided frameworks and principles to enact emancipatory practices, the two scholars in this session explore the possibilities of decolonizing practices within the field. Through storytelling, these radical scholars seek to remake history by uncovering, reevaluating, and addressing taken for granted phenomena in service learning/community engagement that perpetuate systemic inequalities and the oppression of subaltern communities.
Partners: The scholars in this proposed session see themselves as inextricably tied to the communities and people that they are conducting research, learn, and practice alongside. Situating themselves in two different contexts, one radical scholar transforming the institution from within, the other stewarding transformation across multiple institutions as an independent consultant, both seek to employ decolonizing principles in SLCE and SLCE assessment.
Impacts: Each scholar will highlight their liberatory vision for SLCE drawing upon their lived experiences, critical theoretical knowledge and the context within which they do their work. Participants will leave with models to develop or enhance their own liberatory visions.

Speakers
KH

Kortney Hernandez

Site Manager, Jumpstart
avatar for Heather Mack

Heather Mack

Consultant, Heather Mack Consulting LLC
I am an SLCE assessment consultant. I specialize in the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification.I am committed to an emancipatory vision for SLCE. I accompany white SLCE practitioners in their transition from "inclusive" to "anti-racist." Together, with SLCE practitioners of... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ H

2:30pm

Dismantling the Walls: Facilitating Higher Learning in California Prisons and Jails
In the past 5 years, there has been a rapid expansion of opportunities for men and women who are incarcerated in California to further their education while in custody. The state is on it’s way to creating a prison to college pipeline that will impact students’ lives in a profound way. This workshop will provide an overview of the expansion of higher education in prisons and jails in the state of California. Two case studies will be presented: Cal State Los Angeles offers the only face to face BA degree program for incarcerated students in the state of California and also provides re-entry support via Project Rebound. Pitzer College (along with the Claremont Colleges) offers credit-bearing Inside-Out courses at the California Rehabilitation Center and is doing work to connect community college classes (from Norco) and their associate degree for transfer to their private college classes. They also work on reentry services and prison reform advocacy outside of the classroom. The workshop will explore the challenges of this work, the impact it has on students both in custody and on campus and what the potential is for this work to grow across the state.

Speakers
TL

Taffany Lim

senior director, California State University Los Angeles
TH

Tessa Hicks Peterson

Assistant Vice President of Community Engagement Associate Professor of Urban Studies, Pitzer College
avatar for Ella Turenne

Ella Turenne

Associate Dean, Occidental College


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ C

2:30pm

Picturing Community Engagement: What We Say Through Images and Stories and Why It Matters
This interactive workshop draws on research by Donahue, Fenner, & Mitchell (2015) to explore the ways that photographs convey to a broad audience of students, faculty, and community partners what service learning “is and can be” and to challenge the narrow understanding of service, racialized patterns of helping, and charity orientations to service-learning that result. Communicating the equity and justice oriented aspirations of our field requires thought in choosing images and frames for stories. By examining images of service learning from university websites, we seek to spark critical conversations about identity, representation, strategy and inclusion that highlight gaps between our theory and our practice. Organizations working in and with community to tell stories have expertise to share and wisdom to inspire campuses about relationships that are reciprocal and justice-oriented. This workshop will briefly present the research referenced above. Attendees will analyze images from the study and practicing the method of “audiencing” to share their understanding of those images. We will share how a community partner shares stories visually and end with facilitated discussion of how practitioners can tell stories to challenge ideas about inequality and identity, and to expand the range of ways considered appropriate to address social problems.

Speakers
avatar for E’Rika Chambers

E’Rika Chambers

Executive Director, Collective Impact
E’rika Chambers is a dedicated advocate for youth development in the out of school time field. She has over 25+ years of experience working with youth. E’rika started her youth development work with the Boys & Girls Clubs of SF, where she learned to inspire & enable all young... Read More →
DD

David Donahue

Director, Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, University of San Francisco
avatar for Leslie Lombre

Leslie Lombre

Director, External Relations, Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, University of San Francisco


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ B

2:30pm

Leveraging Learning and Leadership through Student Engagement Scholars: Transformations of the Self in Community
Outcomes from college students (n=151) at 30 colleges who participated in a semester-long California Campus Compact Community Engagement Student Fellowship indicate as a result of the experience enriched academic and professional competencies including expanded knowledge, empathetic understanding, psycho-motor abilities, and leadership skills. Fellowship students described their experiences as “capacity-building”, “educationally-empowering”, and “career-solidifying”. In turn, these facets of inspiration and purpose coalesced into students’ increased sense of community agency and efficacy—having the skills and motivation to continue to transform themselves and others. Moreover, students articulated that what differentiated this community engagement from other forms of experiential and collaborative learning is that the Fellowship held them accountable for advancing social responsibility. In other words,the impact of a Scholars program is that the power of knowledge is realized when publicly enacted. The purpose is to present an overview of the CESF Fellows that can be easily replicated on any campus. The objectives are to highlight this Low-investment and Low-infrastructure strategy by detailed sharing of best practices including opportunities for brainstorming next steps for those who want to implement a similar program. The panel presentation is a partnership of the program director, campus director, Fellowship student, and assessment consultant.

Speakers
CC

Christine Cress

Professor, PACE Program, Graduate School of Education, Portland State University
avatar for Piper McGinley

Piper McGinley

Associate Director, California Campus Compact
avatar for Lezlee Matthews

Lezlee Matthews

Director Community-Based Learning, Loyola Marymount University
Community-Based Learning
UN

Uma Nicole

M.A. Bioethics Candidate, Class of 2019, Loyola Marymount University


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ E

2:30pm

Thematic Poster Session #3
Poster 1: Immersion as a Practice: From Serving to Joining. This poster session and dialogue will explore how two universities have jointly developed an approach that names and frames “immersion as a practice” (IAAP) and have used this approach as the foundation of an 8-week summer fellowship in the San Francisco Bay Area and on the U.S. / Mexico border.

Poster 2: LIFT Conference: A Gathering of Student Service Leaders in California. The LIFT Conference is a student driven project with a goal of convening student leaders who share an affinity for promoting, supporting, and advocating for meaningful service opportunities in college. In this session we’ll share findings and experiences from our first event held in October 2018 at Fresno State.

Poster 3: Mobilizing College Students through Community Service-Learning. Service learning and social justice-centered curriculum create a unique opportunity for students in higher education to enhance their academic achievement, professional identities, and their civic engagement. Students who performed service learning as a part of the curriculum felt empowered by their ability to make meaningful differences in their community.

Poster 4:  First Year Service Corps (FYSC): Promoting Involvement of First Year Students in Service and Civic Engagement. In this poster session, the University of Utah’s Bennion Center will explain the First Year Service Corps program, which brings together a diverse group of freshman students who desire to serve their community and become civically engaged. Participants will gain insight on engaging freshman students on their own campuses.

Poster 5:  Bennion Service House: 15 Years of a Civically Engaged Themed Community. This poster will explore the Bennion Service House; a civically engaged themed living-learning community at the University of Utah, it's history, programming, residential education model, civic competencies, and mechanisms for engaging the its residents to become active in lifelong learning and civic participation through action, change, and learning.

Poster 6: Promoting Educational Opportunities for Youth: An Interdisciplinary Approach. This poster will highlight key civic engagement efforts in the Whittier, CA area. Multiple approaches will be presented that focus on increasing high school graduation rates in local communities.

Poster 7:  Building Bright Futures for Youth on Oahu. This poster will highlight Manoa Mentors, founded in order to give students at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa opportunities to serve low-income and immigrant youth on Oahu. Since its inception, Manoa Mentors has provided tutorial services and academic support to the students of the economically challenged neighborhood of Palolo Valley in Honolulu, with the hope of improving both short and longterm educational outcomes for the youth in this community.

Moderators
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Gretchen Wehrle

Professor, Notre Dame de Namur University

Speakers
GW

Gretchen Wehrle

Professor, Notre Dame de Namur University
CS

Carly Shields

Student Board Representative, University of Utah
First Year Service Corps: Promoting Involvement of First Year Students in Service and Civic Engagement
avatar for Bryce Williams

Bryce Williams

Student Programs Coordinator, University of Utah, Bennion Center
avatar for John Loggins

John Loggins

Director of Community Engaged Learning, University of San Diego
John Loggins the Director of Community Engaged Learning in the Karen and Tom Mulvaney Center for Community, Awareness and Social Action at the University of San Diego. John works collaboratively as part of a team responsible for ensuring that USD is a global and national leader as... Read More →
avatar for Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Assistant Director, Richter Center for Community Engagement and Service-Learning at Fresno State
avatar for Ryan M. Lamberton

Ryan M. Lamberton

Assistant Director, Community Engagement, Saint Mary's College of California
LA

Lucia Alcala

Aasst Professor, CSU Fullerton
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Keely Vandenberge

First Year Service Corps Director, University of Utah, Bennion Center
avatar for Manuel Chavez

Manuel Chavez

Engaged Student Leadership Award Recipient, Whittier College
avatar for Andrew Menor

Andrew Menor

Engaged Student Leadership Award Recipient, University of Hawaii, Manoa


Thursday March 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:40pm
KIPJ D

3:40pm

Break
Thursday March 7, 2019 3:40pm - 4:00pm
KIPJ Rotunda

4:00pm

Community Engagement, Power, and Privilege in Makuleke, South Africa
The main goals of this presentation are to share what we have learned about designing and implementing a community engagement experience that is co-created with our South African partners in Makuleke Village and to have a conversation with others about the opportunities and challenges of this model. First, this session foucses on the creation of this community engagement experience. While it has evolved over the last seven years, it has always relied upon a partnership between USD, the non-profit Sharing to Learn, and a Makuleke-based student group called the Equalizers. We believe that there are important lessons to be learned from how these partnerships have developed and deepened over the years. Second, the Youth Leadership Workshop is co-created each year with our partners and has focused on a variety of specific issues. The Workshop itself provides an opportunity for the USD students and the Makuleke students to address issues of power and privilege through specific activities that address our unequal global power positions. And third, the presenters will discuss some of the failures they have experienced while doing this program in Makuleke and the ways in which they have sought to respond to these failures.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Nunn, PhD

Lisa Nunn, PhD

Associate Professor of Sociology, University of San Diego
I am a cultural sociologist who studies education and sexualities. In particular, I am interested in the ways that institutions shape our identities. I am an advocate of experiential learning for undergraduate students--and for everyone, actually.
avatar for Mike Williams

Mike Williams

Professor, University of San Diego
I am an Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations and I specialize on African politics and development. I am also the Director of the Changemaker Hub at the University of San Diego. I am interested in promoting programs and experiences for students that... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ F

4:00pm

A Contemplative Community Building Toolkit
In April 2016, the Center for Contemplative Mind (CMind) and the Fetzer Institute convened a gathering of higher education faculty and staff who had played a role in growing and sustaining campus groups that emphasized contemplative practices. Out of these discussions and a series of seed grants to support community-building initiatives, CMind developed a .pdf toolkit to support the building of contemplative communities in higher education contexts.

The toolkit is organized into six sections, reflecting common phases and challenges. During this community conversation session, we will have opportunities to share questions, experiences, and resources corresponding to these topics, which are: Intention (Laying the Groundwork); Invitation (Creating a Welcoming Community); Sustainability (Building a Sustainable Community); Meetings and Events; Conflict Transformation; Connecting the Dots (Being Part of a Larger Movement).

Copies of the toolkit will be available.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Bergman

Carrie Bergman

Associate Director, The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society
Carrie Bergman joined CMind in 2000 and, over the past 19 years, has helped to coordinate events, projects, and initiatives across all of the Center’s program areas. She now serves as Associate Director, supporting CMind’s programs, operations, website, and communications, including... Read More →
avatar for Maya Elinevsky

Maya Elinevsky

Events & Outreach Manager, The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society
Maya Elinevsky organizes the Center’s conferences, workshops, and retreats. She holds a BA in Communication from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and an Associate’s Degree in Fine Arts from Greenfield Community College. Her professional experience lies in event work and... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ A

4:00pm

Countering Assimilation in the Land of Mickey Mouse: Strengthening Latino/a Identities in Study Abroad
The session describes an approach that engages Latino/a first-generation college students in study abroad programs in Latin America as a way to counter assimilation to United States Whiteness and strengthen their own immigrant/Latino/a and other identities. Three instructors of the program will engage the audience in a discussion of the design and implementation of this novel program, including (i) a review the challenges that limit Latino/a students in participating in study abroad, (ii) a purposeful design of critical service-learning ‘beyond borders’, (iii) an approach to recruitment, (iv) the involvement of the students’ family and a (v) career counseling component. Through the use of video, interviews and participant observation, student voices will be used to illustrate the development of purposeful personal, academic and professional growth before and after the implementation of the programs. The session will delve into themes that arise from these experiences, such as (a) family conflict and negotiation about the value of study abroad and the role of college, (b) shame and pride about the loss and proficiency of the Spanish language and (c) how foster Latino/a cultural ways of knowing/being and at the same time navigate Whiteness in their lives; among others.

Speakers
avatar for Julián Jefferies

Julián Jefferies

Associate Professor, California State University, Fullerton
avatar for Miguel Martinez

Miguel Martinez

Career Center Specialist, California State University, Fullerton
avatar for Blanca Rojas

Blanca Rojas

Instructor, California State University, Fullerton


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ E

4:00pm

Workers are Parents Too! Parent Engagement with Low-wage Workers, their Children and First-Generation Students
In the U.S today, over 6 million low-wage workers are parents with children under the age of 18. Over half of these low-wage worker parents are women and many are single mothers. People of color, African Americans, Latinos, and immigrant workers are overrepresented in nearly all low-wage sector jobs like domestic work, janitorial, child care, and garment production. Much of the research available on low-wage parents’ ability to engage in their children’s education has focused on inequitable workplace conditions (unpredictable schedules, wage theft, lack of workplace flexibility) and public policies that fail to support working mothers and fathers. Little public debate or community-based research, however, has positioned parent workers and their unions or workers centers from a vantage point of strength and as a resource to support working families in navigating the educational system for their public school learners. This workshop will highlight 3 parent-worker models and share how a first-generation service-learning mentorship project connected university students with low-wage families and their worker organizations. We intend to engage the audience in a dialogue focused on learner and parent-worker assets and success as well as program opportunities for educators. We will also view a newly released short video on the projects.

Speakers
avatar for Marisol Granillo Arce

Marisol Granillo Arce

Parent Engagement Coordinator, UCLA Labor Center
Marisol Granillo Arce graduated in June 2018 with her Master in Social Welfare from UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and started a Master in Public Health in Community Health Sciences in September 2018 at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She migrated to the U.S. with her... Read More →
avatar for Aida Cardenas

Aida Cardenas

Executive Director, Building Skills Partnership, SEIU USWW
As executive director of Building Skills Partnership (BSP), Aida Cardenas leads a unique training collaboration between the janitors’ union (Service Employees International Union-United Service Workers West or SEIU-USWW), responsible businesses, and the community to advance the... Read More →
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Claudia Palacios

Parent Engagement Coordinator, Idespca-Mujeres en Accion
avatar for Janna Shadduck-Hernandez, University of California, Los Angeles

Janna Shadduck-Hernandez, University of California, Los Angeles

Project Director, UCLA Labor Center
anna Shadduck-Hernández, Ed.D. is a Project Director at the UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education. She teaches in UCLA’s Labor and Workplace Studies Minor and the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Shadduck-Hernández’s research and teaching have focused... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ 220

4:00pm

Building Capacity for Crossing Social and Political Borders through Sustained Dialogue
Sustained Dialogue is a highly adaptable intergroup dialogue model based on the work of Dr. Harold Saunders in international peace negotiations. The Sustained Dialogue Campus Network (SDCN) helps colleges and universities build capacity for campus dialogue by supporting administrators, faculty, staff, and students in developing and implementing campus dialogue initiatives and building campus cultures of dialogue. Students, faculty, staff, and administrators involved in campus SD programs together move from dialogue to action on community conflicts, especially those involving social identity. In this interactive presentation, SDCN staff will share profiles of varied campuses using the SD model and lessons for spreading dialogue work formally and informally on campuses. The session will also include key elements, concepts, and values of the model and a ready-to-implement activity to take home. This session should particularly benefit those considering implementation of intergroup dialogue processes within civic engagement programs for students, faculty, staff, administrators, and campus leaders.

Speakers
avatar for Michaela Grenier

Michaela Grenier

Program Director, SDCN, Sustained Dialogue Institute
The Sustained Dialogue Institute helps citizens around the world to transform their relationships and to design and implement sustainable change processes. The Sustained Dialogue Campus Network (SDCN) first began to form as a student-created branch of SDI in 1999 and has since grown... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ I

4:00pm

Data, Demography, Democracy, Destiny
Given our current national political climate, there are valid and heightened concerns about the administration, integrity, and accuracy of the 2020 Census. The Census results will have a major impact on targeted resource allocations, the reapportionment of the US Congress, and legislative district boundaries; all of which can lead to policy changes that disrupt the pubic support systems and programs that underserved  communities, families and indivduals need. What can we learn from history? What actions can be helpful now as we prepare for Census 2020? What can we do as institutions of higher education to work along side our respective communities to increase awareness, to stay current on the latest Census related news; and together take action to ensure a representative count.

Speakers
avatar for Sefa Aina

Sefa Aina

Director, Associate Dean and Director of the Draper Center for Community Partnerships, Pomona College
Sefa Aina is currently the Associate Dean and Director of the Asian American Resource Center at Pomona College.  He has served as an academic and student-organizational advisor, as well as an instructor for Asian American Studies programs at University of California, Los Angeles... Read More →
avatar for Robert Franco

Robert Franco

Director, Institutional Effectiveness, Kapi'olani Community College and University of Hawai'i
Dr. Robert Franco is a cultural anthropologist whose research focuses on contemporary Hawaiian, Samoan, and Pacific Islander sociocultural issues. As Director of the Office for Institutional Effectiveness (OFIE), he supervises institutional researchers who conduct quantitative studies... Read More →
avatar for Gabriela Gamiz

Gabriela Gamiz

Director, Community Engagement, Harvey Mudd College


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ D

4:00pm

​Opening the Front Door: Aligning an Inclusive Mission by Examining Program Application Processes
We contextualize a theoretical commitment to inclusivity as a process from articulating mission, investigating program practices, collecting and analyzing program data, and tackling aspects of program design that are taken for granted – applications. We offer a case study of how approaching how students applie for experiential programs as being pedagogical and how, as we determined the potential barriers for access in those processes, we were better able to create a vision for programming that foregrounded access and student development aligned with our center’s mission. The process involved strategic meetings to generate shared understandings and goals around access and inclusion with multiple institutional partners. Initial qualitative data analyses of applications propelled further conversations about their curricular and gateway role in our experiential programs. Further quantitative data analysis of program participants along with mission-centered conversations resulted in the development of a revised program vision and application materials with intentional design, and the development of curriculum for student leaders to foreground questions of access as they selected student-participants for programs they lead. After presentation of this case study, we will facilitate workshopping strategic program design and best practices in the application processes. Participants are encouraged to bring program application materials to workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Danika Brown

Danika Brown

Director of Curriculum & Fellowships, Center for Civic Leadership at Rice University
avatar for Morgan Kinney

Morgan Kinney

Associate Director Programs, Center for Civic Leadership at Rice University
avatar for Caroline Quenemoen

Caroline Quenemoen

Associate Dean of Students, Rice University
Caroline Quenemoen is Associate Dean of Undergraduates and Director of Inquiry Based Learning at Rice University. In this role she oversees the Center for Civic Leadership and the university’s new initiative in experiential inquiry and research. Previously, she served at Rice University... Read More →
avatar for Alan Steinberg

Alan Steinberg

Associate Director, Center for Civic Leadership at Rice University
Alan Steinberg is an Associate Director of Houston Programs and Partnerships at Rice University's Center for Civic Leadership (CCL). He leads the Houston Action Research Teams (HART) program where interdisciplinary groups of Rice University undergraduates work on evidence based research... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ H

4:00pm

Transforming Volunteerism to Social Impact in Conservative Utah
“You know what kind of community surrounds UVU, right?!” When we told our in-state colleagues our plans to transform Utah Valley University’s Volunteer & Service-Learning Center into the Center for Social Impact, they thought we were crazy—and that it couldn’t be done. UVU is located in the heart of a very conservative county in a very conservative state, and is now home to the Center for Social Impact. With our updated mission of "Driving social impact by connecting students and community," we now promote a framework of diverse pathways for active citizenship that goes beyond volunteerism and service-learning. By combining Stanford’s Public Service Pathways and Break Away’s Active Citizen Continuum, we design programs, initiatives, and collaborations that move students from pathway entry points to more substantial community learning experiences. This storytelling session will detail the journey we took to realize this transformation, including the development of our strategic framework, getting campus buy-in and formal approval, and our plans moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Amber Hendrickson

Amber Hendrickson

Community Partnerships Coordinator, Utah Valley University
avatar for Summer Valente

Summer Valente

Director, Utah Valley University
JW

Jonathan Westover

Associate Professor of Organizational Leadership; Director, Academic Service Learning, Utah Valley University


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ C

4:00pm

Validating and Enhancing Your Competencies as a Community Engagement Professional: Campus Compact's New CEP Credentialing Program
In the spring of 2019, Campus Compact begins a full roll out its new Credentialing Program for Community Engagement Professionals (CEPs). The role of this conference session is to inform attendees about the origins, purpose, development, and structure of the program as well as to share information about how one can apply for various micro-credentials and work toward earning a broader certification. The session will include lessons learned from the pilot project (scheduled for fall 2018) and will leave ample time for attendees to ask questions about all aspects of the program. The session also provides an important opportunity for Campus Compact to receive feedback from the field about the content, development, marketing, and implementation of the new credentialing program.

Speakers
avatar for Clayton Hurd

Clayton Hurd

Director, Professional Learning, Campus Compact
I'm a cultural anthropologist and public scholar with over 20 years experience developing and facilitating community-engaged learning and research programs at a range of higher education institutions. My areas of practice include faculty development, institutionalization of community... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ B

4:00pm

Votes and Ballots - Gamifying Voter Engagement Planning
The purpose of this workshop is to introduce a framework to institutionalize democratic engagement equitably across a campus community. Facilitators will cover the Strengthening American Democracy template for writing democratic engagement plans and its sections, Leadership, Commitment, Landscape, Goals, Strategy, Reporting, and Evaluation. Facilitators and participants will review Votes and Ballots, which has turned the template into worksheets, a strategy poster, and tactic cards. Facilitators will highlight issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the planning process and materials, such as using the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE) to identify politically-marginalized segments of the campus community by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and field of study. Participants will leave with the knowledge and resources necessary to facilitate the Votes and Ballots activity themselves. Strengthening American Democracy was developed by the Students Learn Students Vote Coalition including All In, AASCU’s American Democracy Project, Campus Compact’s The Democracy Commitment, Campus Vote Project, NASPA, and Young Invincibles. Votes and Ballots was developed by Democracy Works and Maryland Institute College of Art and was field tested at 7 conveings in Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, Florida, Virginia, and North Carolina. Facilitators will also reference Institutionalizing Voter Engagement, A Guide to Developing and Adopting Handbook Language.

Votes & Ballots materials are available here.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Burns

Mike Burns

Director, Campus Vote Project
avatar for Anjelica Smith

Anjelica Smith

TurboVote Campus Outreach Lead, Democracy Works
Anjelica Smith is Campus Outreach Lead for TurboVote at Democracy Works, a nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to the idea that voting should fit the way we live. In her role as Campus Outreach Lead she works to sustain and grow the TurboVote higher education program... Read More →


Thursday March 7, 2019 4:00pm - 5:10pm
KIPJ G

5:15pm

IARSCLE Community-Engaged Research Reception
Join board members from the International Association for Research on Service-Learning & Community Engagement and share your ideas and insights about community-engaged research trends and opportunities.

Co-Sponsored by the International Association for Research on Service-Learning & Community Engagement and USD’s Mulvaney Center for Community, Awareness, and Social Action.



Thursday March 7, 2019 5:15pm - 6:30pm
KIPJ Garden of the Sea

5:15pm

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from USD back to the Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel during the hours posted above.

Thursday March 7, 2019 5:15pm - 7:00pm
University of San Diego
 
Friday, March 8
 

7:15am

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 15-20 minutes to take participants from the  Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel to the conference site at USD during the hours posted above.

Friday March 8, 2019 7:15am - 9:15am
Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel

7:30am

Breakfast
Friday March 8, 2019 7:30am - 8:15am
KIPJ Rotunda

7:30am

Conference Registration
Friday March 8, 2019 7:30am - 12:45pm
KIPJ Rotunda

8:15am

Western Region Engagement Awards
Speakers
JH

Jennifer Hine

Executive Director, Washington Campus Compact
avatar for Elaine Ikeda

Elaine Ikeda

Executive Director, California Campus Compact
Since 2000, Elaine Ikeda has served as the Executive Director of California CampusCompact (CACC). She has over 20 years of experience supervising volunteers in higher education, conducting research on service-learning, volunteerism and community service, and disseminating service-learning... Read More →
AP

Atina Pascua

Executive Director, Hawaii Pacific Islands Campus Compact
avatar for Josh Todd

Josh Todd

Executive Director, Campus Compact of Oregon


Friday March 8, 2019 8:15am - 8:30am
KIPJ Theatre

8:30am

The Compact in Focus: Return on Equity and Community College Engagement
What lies ahead for higher education engagement? How can Campus Compact deepen its focus on priority areas for partner campuses? Can a panel discussion really be energetic and inspirational? All good questions! Join Marisol Morales, Verdis Robinson, and Stephanie Schooley for a focused conversation and Q&A on two Campus Compact priorities: community college engagement and work around Return on Equity.

Speakers
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

VP of Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →
avatar for Verdis Robinson

Verdis Robinson

Director, Community College Engagement, Campus Compact
avatar for Stephanie Schooley

Stephanie Schooley

Executive Director, Campus Compact of the Mountain West
Stephanie Schooley became the Executive Director of CCMW in 2010 after serving with the organization since 2001. Over the course of Stephanie’s career with Campus Compact, she developed and implemented national service and community-engagement programming, expanded CCMW's partnerships, brought... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
KIPJ Theatre

9:15am

Break
Friday March 8, 2019 9:15am - 9:30am
KIPJ Rotunda

9:30am

Community-Campus Coalitions for Change
Institutions of higher education have been described as anchor institutions in communities, providing opportunities for committed and sustained collaborations to address community and public issues. As partners in community engagement, it is incumbent on all of us to create space for sustained collaborative action toward common goals. In that context, staff from the Center for Civic Engagement at Washington State University will facilitate a community conversation about the role of community engagement in creating coalitions for change. As an introduction to the discussion, WSU staff will share examples and strategies from their own work to build and support successful collaborations including: Palouse Food Project, Palouse STEAM Coalition, Town-Gown Collaborative, Cougs Vote Coalition, and Palouse Health Network. This conversation will be framed around the following questions: • Why are coalitions emerging as critical vehicles for change? • What is the role of centers for community engagement in fostering effective coalitions? • How are community-campus coalitions created, supported, and sustained? Through this session, participants will: deepen their understanding of the critical importance of coalition building, collectively imagine the role of community engagement centers in creating space for coalition building, and determine strategies for creating sustainable coalitions to ensure lasting change in communities.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Lazo

Ryan Lazo

Community Partnerships Coordinator, Washington State University
Community partnerships, Community Partner Relationships, AmeriCorps, AmeriCorps VISTA, Civic Engagement, Sustainability projects, Food Systems, Food Access, ... and backpacking.
JP

Jessica Perone

Faculty Consultant, Washington State University


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ 220

9:30am

National Service Members as Servant Leaders
National Service members (e.g. VISTAs and AmeriCorps members) and student volunteers and service learners often come from outside the communities where they serve, and in many cases relocate for service. Additionally, They are charged to work with and through community members to enact positive change that communities own. This session will examine a set of questions about how outsiders can best support local communities, especially focusing on best practices around entering rural and tribal communities as outsiders.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Vanek

Josh Vanek

Associate Director, Montana Campus Compact
Josh is the associate director of the Montana Campus Compact, an 18 campus consortium. Nationally Compact has 1100 members and amplifies the community work of higher ed. Josh writes and manages grants, supports campuses and gets inspired by students and faculty, staff and administrators... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ F

9:30am

Decolonizing Service-Learning: Indigenous Collage Methodology and Possible Futures
This hands-on interactive session will invite folks to participate in their own collage projects with presenters. After an introduction to theories of settler colonialism, indigenous feminisms, and indigenous collage frameworks by presenters, participants will be encouraged to work and think through a project of their own. We encourage colleagues to consider the pervasive influence of settler colonialism and to consider that, in-spite of our most well-intentioned efforts, settler logics continue to limit our imaginations of the possible. Specifically, we draw on indigenous scholar Leanne Charlie’s collage methodology. “Indigenous collage invites us to work with the fragmented realities of Indigenous identities, families, communities, cultures, and lands that have been created—sometimes violently, always intentionally—by historical and contemporary colonialism. It offers a space for indigenous historical realities, present realities, and desired futures to intersect in innovative and unexpected ways.” Our theory of change honors ontology and action over Western privileged epistemology. We acknowledge that we cannot only think our way out of coloniality—we must be the doers. We invite our participants to bring with them a current or recent problem of practice, a research question, recent rumination, or a challenge that you hope to think through and address.

Speakers
avatar for Deanna Chappell Belcher

Deanna Chappell Belcher

Doctoral Candidate, University of Oregon
Since UO discontinued the Service-Learning Program, I have been focusing full time on my doctoral work. I am beginning to gather data in Portland and Seattle for my research on teacher activists and teacher activism. Inspired by activist teachers in Eugene, I am active in CAPE... Read More →
avatar for James Snyder

James Snyder

Doctoral Candidate, University of Oregon
Jimmy Snyder is a 4th year PhD candidate in the Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education program at the University of Oregon. He is a citizen of the Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas. He is a 2009 graduate of the UO Sapsik'ʷałá master degree program and has a history degree from... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ B

9:30am

Centering Racial Justice through Challenging White Supremacy Culture
Purpose: This anti-oppression workshop will focus on taking action to both identify and address common characteristics of white supremacy culture that manifest in organizations/institutions/communities. The widely known anti-racism tool, "white supremacy culture" developed by Dismantling Racism, lists out commonplace and unspoken norms that ultimately serve to reinforce systemic racism. As defined by Tema Okun, white supremacy culture characteristics are "damaging because they are used as norms and standards without being proactively named or chosen by the group…Because we all live in a white supremacy culture, these characteristics show up in the attitudes and behaviors of all of us – people of color and white people." Objectives: The workshop will introduce the concept of white supremacy culture and guide participants through discussion and reflection regarding how these characteristics show up within our communities (and ourselves). After the initial focus on identification/analysis, the workshop will transition into action planning to address white supremacy culture. This will include discussion of potential antidotes suggested by Dismantling Racism as well as holding space for participants to consider additional possible solutions. Impacts: Participants to come away with new analytical and action tools/ideas for transforming white supremacy culture to bring back to their communities.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Ferrick

Kathleen Ferrick

Program Coordinator, University of Denver Center for Community Engagement to advance Scholarship and Learning (CCESL)


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ E

9:30am

Service Learning with LGBTQ Populations: Beyond Heteronormative Borders
Service learning courses such as Queer Painting, Queer Hip Hop Pedagogies and Comparative Queer Literature center the rights of marginalized groups through: proximity through interpersonal relationships; reinforcement of partners’ core talents and assets; and participatory evaluations. Students, a number of whom identify as ‘marginalized’ witness the spirited advocacy of organizations that mobilize against inequity. Course evaluations have been positive. The panel discussion at COS is inspired by a public reflection facilitated by the Haas Center for Public Service at Stanford in Fall 2018 that focused on issues such as reciprocity and sustainability in a partnership with the LGBT Youth Space and other organizations serving LGBTQ populations. In this follow up dialogue, the cohort of nontraditional educators, representing Stanford staff, adjunct and student instructors and community partners, will discuss their experience of cross-sector and multidisciplinary trespass that has allowed them to foster new praxis and platforms for open and ethical dialogue on community engagement and learning. They will promote the practice of participatory reflection and evaluation and argue that this is has been key to their development as emerging engaged scholars and practitioners.

Speakers
avatar for Petra Dierkes-Thrun

Petra Dierkes-Thrun

Lecturer, Stanford University
Humanities and Digital Pedagogy Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies Contingent labor in an elite university
AK

Adrienne Keel

Director of LGBTQ Programs, The LGBT Youth Space and LGBTQ Wellness
avatar for Chiseche Mibenge

Chiseche Mibenge

Director Community Engaged Learning, Stanford University
Dr. Mibenge is a human rights lawyer and educator. She has taught undergraduate and graduate level human rights courses at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and Lehman College in the Department of Political Science and more recently in the Human Rights Masters Program... Read More →
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Ashley L. Newby

Lecturer, Stanford University
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Tori Parrish

Stanford student pursuing a B.A. in Art Practice with Honors & (student instructor), Stanford University


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ C

9:30am

We Believe People Matter: Equity Based Frameworks as the Foundation of Our Work
Despite the CSU’s historic commitment to access, too often we utilize a “deficit model” to both design programs for students from historically and currently underrepresented groups and to explain persistent, achievement, and graduation gaps. This deficit model assumes that students who do not succeed in the CSU are the problem that needs to be fixed. What happens if, instead, we focus on our educational model as the leading contributor to a lack of student success? The CSU Center for Community Engagement believes all students have the talent, drive and motivation to succeed. We strive to deliver supportive high-quality learning opportunities that honor their characteristics, knowledge, practices and attitudes. Therefore, we have adopted three core frameworks: Community Cultural Wealth, Spheres of Influence and Cross-Cultural Understanding. In this session participants will: • Develop a shared understanding of the benefits and challenges of the current use of language being used across higher education institutions to describe students historically and currently underrepresented in STEM degree programs. • Expand knowledge of several frameworks and models of theory, • Deepen our capacity to advance students’ education experiences using an equity lens.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Barger

Kristina Barger

VISTA Program Manager, California State University, Center for Community Engagement
avatar for Judy Botelho

Judy Botelho

Director, Center for Community Engagement, California State University, Center for Community Engagement


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ D

9:30am

Building Community: 50 years of Service-Learning Together
Combining pedagogy and civic engagement did not arise from a single theorist but rather from the experiences of diverse educators, philanthropists, and activists. It developed when young people actively supported equal rights and opposed a war on foreign soil. It blossomed without a governing body or any public legislation. “Service-learning” advocates first convened in Atlanta in 1969, 50 years ago and 20 years prior to the formation of Campus Compact. In those early days most service-learning efforts were undertaken in spite of the will of university faculty and administrators rather than with their support. Service-learning professionals battled to win the hearts, minds and budgets of highly traditional, resistant institutions. Key to success was the strong, nurturing, critical community that came together through the National Society for Internships and Experiential Education (NSIEE), which enabled members to lean on one another for ideas, challenges and inspiration. This networked community enabled the work to become accepted as critical to higher education and civic engagement. This session builds upon and promotes this community by enabling participants to engage in one-on-one interviews that bring together the field’s pioneers, its new voices, and community partnes to explore/share motivations, convictions and questions about their goals and practice.

Speakers
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Tammara Anderson

Associate Dean of Experiental and Applied Learning, USC Dornslife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
avatar for Dick Cone

Dick Cone

Retired director JEP/USC, USC Joint Educational Project
I have been engaged in servcice-learning since 1976 and have witneswsed the growth of the movement warts and all. I am interested in the reflection policy and attending to our on-going weaknesses.
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

VP of Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →
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Tim Stanton

Senior Engaged Scholar, Ravensong Associates, and Director Emeritus of Stanford’s Overseas Studies Program in Cape Town


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ I

9:30am

Self-Care & Reflective Practices: Do We Really? Can We Really?
According to the National College Health Assessment, 40.2% of students suffer from depression on a nationwide basis. Additionally, 1 in 12 students has a suicide plan. A 2016 Nonprofit Employment Practices Survey reported that turnover rates in nonprofit staffing continue to grow. A study from Columbia, Harvard, and Georgetown found that “the busier a person appeared, the more important they were deemed,” lending to the “Cult of Busyness” that seems to have erupted in our culture. Each of these statistics and findings are indicative of the day to day that staff members, educators, community partners, and students face. They are overworked, overcommitted, exhausted, depressed, stressed, etc. In our session, we hope to discuss the role that institutions of higher education play in creating this culture (examples: exceedingly high expectations students need to meet to gain college acceptance, asking staff/faculty to do more with less) and what role they can play in shifting our culture to support a more holistic picture of success and wealth. Furthermore, we hope to crowdsource real ways to engage in intentional self-care and reflective practices and advocate for such opportunities to administrators and other power brokers.

Speakers
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Taylan Bennett-Parker

Special Projects Coordinator, California State University, Fresno
avatar for Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Mellissa Jessen-Hiser

Assistant Director, Richter Center for Community Engagement and Service-Learning at Fresno State


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ A

9:30am

What About Alumni?
Despite ample evidence that service-learning enables students to understand the power of their voices and actions, many educators remain dubious about the benefits and utility of this pedagogical approach. Thus, there is a need demonstrate the long term effects of service-learning. Through an exploratory qualitative study, the Center for Community Learning & Leadership at San Jose State University endeavored to elucidate the perceptions of alumni who participated in service-learning as students to examine whether their experiences influenced their career pathways and to understand the mechanisms of this influence. During summer 2018, snowball sampling was used to identify service-learning alumni who currently work at local agencies contributing to the public good. The alumni were individually interviewed by our California Campus Compact Community Engagement Student Fellow. The interview transcriptions provided a rich set of data to identify common themes in alumni experiences. Initial results suggest that service-learning improved alumni skills in the areas of: public speaking; time management; communication; leadership; decision-making; organization; and teaching. The results also indicate that service-learning provided an opportunity for alumni to gain insight into their strengths and use their insights to identify and obtain jobs focused on equity and civic engagement.

Speakers
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Elena Klaw

Faculty Director, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
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Marizela Maciel

CACC Community Engagement Student Fellow, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
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Andrea Tully

Community Engagement & Project Coordinator, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership
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Brianna Young

Research Assistant, San José State University Center for Community Learning & Leadership


Friday March 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:40am
KIPJ G

10:40am

Break
Friday March 8, 2019 10:40am - 11:00am
KIPJ Rotunda

11:00am

Promoting Community-Based Research by Creating an Open Access Online Reviewed Volume
Community-Based Research (CBR) offers widely recognized benefits to students and to communities. While it can be a work of passion on the part of faculty, it requires great effort without formal or professional recognition. Finding ways to formally recognize and document CBR projects has the potential to increase the benefits to all participants, and thereby create incentives for increased applications of CBR. We present a campus-based project to create an open access annual reviewed digital volume for CBR reports (CBR@CSUCI) designed to recognize and publicize model CBR projects at our campus. Our workshop will describe the rationale for the initiative, and the steps that we have taken to realize it. Specifically, we address the following topics: Rationale for a CBR volume/repository; Finding institutional support on campus; Developing a review process (and specifying how it articulates with RTP processes); Recruiting editors and reviewers; Developing necessary guidelines and materials; Creating a call for submissions, and cultivating submissions; Developing an online system for submission, review, and publication; and Developing a long-term plan for expanding CBR capacity. The workshop will help participants to recognize the potential in such initiatives, and to provide specific tools for implementing it on their own campus.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Abell

Leslie Abell

Professor, California State University, Channel Islands
avatar for Dennis J. Downey

Dennis J. Downey

Professor, California State University, Channel Islands
Community-Based Research


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ 220

11:00am

Engaging Alumni in Supporting Students Involved in Public Service
Over the last decade, Stanford University’s Haas Center for Public Service has honed techniques of engaging alumni as a resource for students engaged in public service. Alumni experience and wisdom can provide students with potential career roadmaps and connections. In addition, local alumni can help acclimate students to life in a new city. For the alumni, the chance to engage with students provides an exciting connection to their alma mater as they support summer internships preparation and reflection, provide advising, and serve as course resources. Alumni are gratified to share their experiences with students who strive to improve the world. In this session, participants will learn about and share effective strategies for alumni engagement in campus service programs.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Propp

Peggy Propp

Senior Program Director, Outreach and Engagement, Stanford University
As Outreach and Engagement Senior Program Director, Peggy Propp manages all aspects of student outreach and awareness, the Haas Center’s alumni engagement programs, and special events or projects as assigned. She provides strategy and guidance on special communication activities... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ F

11:00am

Building Coalitions for Community Action Inspired by Student Research on Bullying
What can we do when conversations get shut down by legal machinations and polarization? The murder of Lawrence King by a classmate in a local junior high class for being gay created a toxic atmosphere in which many people, especially administrators, shut down. On the heels of this tragedy were a rash of suicides by young people around the country being bullied for being gay. My coalition-building inclinations leapt into high gear. I require students in my Intro to LGBT Studies class to do research projects every semester. So I organized an all-day summit of education, community, and faith leaders (it’s the language of religion that often is employed in these cases) at which my students presented their research on bullying and then sat at tables with leaders to engage in facilitated discussions that built on student research to imagine community actions leaders might engage in to change the culture of bullying and hatred. This workshop will review the key elements to my process for turning student research projects into productive community conversations on difficult topics that produce real action. Participants will brainstorm together problems in their communities and imagine ways to engage student research to creatively intervene.

Speakers
avatar for Julia “Jules” Balén

Julia “Jules” Balén

Faculty Director, California State University, Channel Islands
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Pilar Pacheco

Center Director, CSU Channel Islands


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ E

11:00am

Equity, Community, and Student Voice: Integrative Coaching
This interactive session will model some of the work and research conducted by the session facilitators, then quickly turn the experience around to invite participants to further develop their own interdisciplinary, inter-personal and big question learning projects in the spirit of inclusiveness and multimodal ways of knowing. Presenters will share the purpose and design of the Integrative Coaching program at Dominican University of California through visual syllabi, student feedback and selected exercises (eg. identity wheel and interdisciplinary inquiry activity). Participants will be invited to reflect on similar elements at work in their own institutions and design versions of the activities that they could implement on their own campuses. Time will be set aside for the audience to reflect on how the workshop activities and integrative coaching model can be utilized to develop equity, community and student voice.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew E Davis

Matthew E Davis

Integrative Coach, Dominican University of California
Executive Director, Pseads Institute for Innovation and LearningIntegrative Coaching and Digital PortfoliosService Learning, Equity and LinguisticsNeurocardiology, Embodiment and Composition StudiesContemplative Practice and Social Justice Movements
avatar for Cheramie Leo

Cheramie Leo

Integrative Coach, Dominican University of California


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ A

11:00am

Building Community Connections with Music! Impact and Engagement Through Music Nonprofit and Service-Learning Courses
The arts, by their nature, embrace diverse ways of knowing. Today’s musicians must be able to create their own audiences and community-based musical endeavors in order to communicate, learn, grow, and maximize their creative opportunities. This workshop examines the impact of two community engagement-related music courses. Music Studies Integration is a Service-Learning course in which students develop group projects which meet the needs of a community partner. Nonprofit Music has students building hypothetical nonprofit organizations in teams, addressing various aspects and functions of management. It is rare for a university to offer this particular combination of coursework. Alumni have gone on to employment with nonprofits and have cited these courses as being essential to their growth. We will present a case study on impactful service-residencies involving the Lennon Bus in 2014, 2017, and upcoming in 2019. The John Lennon Educational Tour Bus is a nonprofit organization featuring a state-of-the-art mobile audio and video recording studio which tours the United States promoting music education. Interactive discussions will address audience questions on effective partnership building and will brainstorm possibilities for student community engagement. The presenters are key participants, from Cal Poly Pomona and Pomona Unified School District, in the coursework and residencies.

Speakers
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Dave Kopplin

Professor, Music Department, Cal Poly Pomona
avatar for Michael Millar

Michael Millar

Lecturer, Cal Poly Pomona
avatar for Laura Solis

Laura Solis

Program Administrator for Accountability and Assessment, Pomona Unified School District


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ C

11:00am

Connecting the Work using the Civic Minded Graduate Framework
The Civic Leadership Workshop Series was born out of a partnership between Community Action Volunteers in Education, the Wildcat Leadership Institute - both programs of the within Student Affairs, and the Office of Civic Engagement which is housed in Undergraduate Education at Chico State. Motivating this partnership was an interest in connecting the work of volunteering with academic programs and also to pilot the promotion of the civic-minded graduate framework as a model for the campus. The Series consisted of five, faculty-led and facilitated workshops focusing on the concept of the civic-minded graduate, an emerging concept linking student’s identity, educational and civic experiences. Following each session, students were required to complete a brief assessment consisting of 4-5 learning outcomes as well as a reflection essay based on specific prompts by the faculty facilitator. An average of 35 students attended each session. Program evaluations indicate that overall the pilot program was effective in supporting students to consider how their academic work connects with both their community work and their developing identities – thus, the civic-minded graduate. Students shared deep insights and demonstrated excellent critical reflection on the concepts and ideas presented. An enhanced program will launch in the fall of 2018.

Speakers
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cathryn carkhuff

CAVE Program Coordinator, Associated Students CSU, Chico
avatar for Susan Roll

Susan Roll

Director of Civic Engagement, California State University, Chico
avatar for Ann Schwab

Ann Schwab

Program Director, California State University, Chico
An alumna of Community Action Volunteers in Education’s (CAVE) Big Brother Big Sister program while an undergraduate at Chico State, Ann joined CAVE’s professional staff in 1999 and was named Program Director in 2015. CAVE’s mission is to provide Chico State students with meaningful... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ B

11:00am

Finding Common Understanding and Purpose Through Dialogue
A Deliberative Dialogue Forum brings people together in a small gathering to deliberate about challenging public issues. The process is guided by a neutral moderator and a discussion guide that presents multiple approaches to addressing the problem. Deliberative Dialogue provides an effective framework for mutual understanding and a common purpose that allows people to discuss difficult issues, weigh options, and ultimately take action. This immersive moderator training includes an understanding of deliberation, an overview of the four components of a forum, and engagement in a practice forum. Participants receive strategies and sample questions for moderating a forum, as well as tips and tools for effective moderating. The goal is for participants to be able to take this knowledge back to their institutions or communities to use deliberative dialogues to bring people together. Since 2013, NC Campus Compact has promoted the use of deliberative dialogue as a tool for campuses to build citizens and community. We have trained nearly 500 faculty, staff, and students from 47 colleges and universities, plus community members, to moderate a deliberative dialogue forum.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Garvin

Leslie Garvin

Executive Director, North Carolina Campus Compact


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ G

11:00am

You Are Not Alone! Best Practices for Engaging University Students in Effective Experiential Learning Experiences as Reading and Math Tutors in K – 6 Schools through Service-Learning Programs and the America Reads/Counts Initiative
The purpose of this session is to gather those who are mobilizing university students as reading and math tutors in K – 6 schools surrounding their colleges/universities, or who are in the beginning stages of developing such programs. The main objectives of this session are to introduce a shared on-line platform created collaboratively last year by over 20 California campuses doing this kind of work as a means to share resources and gather new ideas. We also invite campuses across the region into the network to provide support and camaraderie for all who provide these meaningful experiential learning opportunities to university students who serve surrounding campus communities. The partners for these programs include higher education institutions and their civically-minded students who gain meaningful work experiences while addressing a social need. In addition to student impact, our community partners – the K-6 schools and students served – are greatly impacted. The impact for school partners is individualized academic support for K-6 learners. The impact for university students is in an opportunity to learn and grow through service they provide K-6 children in need. Impact for session participants is entry into a supportive network with resources to draw from and add to.

Speakers
avatar for Dick Cone

Dick Cone

Retired director JEP/USC, USC Joint Educational Project
I have been engaged in servcice-learning since 1976 and have witneswsed the growth of the movement warts and all. I am interested in the reflection policy and attending to our on-going weaknesses.
avatar for Chris Fiorentino

Chris Fiorentino

Director. Jan and Bud Richter Center for Community Engagement and Service-Learning, California State University, Fresno
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Tina Koneazny

JEP ReadersPlus Graduate Assistant, University of Southern California
avatar for Allina Mojarro

Allina Mojarro

Community Education Outreach Coordinator, UC Santa Barbara
avatar for Renee Scott

Renee Scott

Director Early Education Programs, Stanford University
Renee has been an educator for 20 years, having served as an elementary school teacher, a professional development teacher-leader, and a teacher-candidate educator/supervisor. As a graduate student, she studied the role of vision in new teacher development and word-reading instruction... Read More →


Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:10pm
KIPJ D

11:00am

Hotel Shuttle (Best Western Hacienda Hotel - USD)
The shuttle will be circling every 30-40 minutes to take participants from USD back to the Best Western Plus Hacienda Hotel during the hours posted above.

Friday March 8, 2019 11:00am - 1:15pm
University of San Diego

12:10pm

Reflections and Closing
Speakers
avatar for Elaine Ikeda

Elaine Ikeda

Executive Director, California Campus Compact
Since 2000, Elaine Ikeda has served as the Executive Director of California CampusCompact (CACC). She has over 20 years of experience supervising volunteers in higher education, conducting research on service-learning, volunteerism and community service, and disseminating service-learning... Read More →
avatar for Chris Nayve

Chris Nayve

Associate Vice President Community Engagement, University of San Diego


Friday March 8, 2019 12:10pm - 12:45pm
KIPJ Theatre